RARE_Nobel_Prize_in_Chemistry_Sidney_Altman_Hand_Written_Letter_Dated_1995_COA_01_ifm

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RARE Nobel Prize in Chemistry Sidney Altman Hand Written Letter Dated 1995 COA

RARE Nobel Prize in Chemistry Sidney Altman Hand Written Letter Dated 1995 COA
RARE Nobel Prize in Chemistry Sidney Altman Hand Written Letter Dated 1995 COA

RARE Nobel Prize in Chemistry Sidney Altman Hand Written Letter Dated 1995 COA
This item is certified authentic by Todd Mueller and comes with their Certificate of Authenticity. (born May 7, 1939) is a. Of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology and Chemistry at. In 1989 he shared the. Nobel Prize in Chemistry. For their work on the catalytic properties of. Altman was born on May 7, 1939, in. His parents, Ray (Arlin), a textile worker, and Victor Altman, a grocer. Each coming from Eastern Europe as a young adult, in the 1920s. Altman’s mother was from. Altman’s father, born in. Had been a worker on a. In the Soviet Union. He was sponsored to come to Canada as a farm worker, but later, as a husband and a father of two sons, he supported the family by running a small grocery store in Montreal. Sidney Altman was later to look back on his parents’ lives as an illustration of the value of the work ethic: It was from them I learned that hard work in stable surroundings could yield rewards, even if only in infinitesimally small increments. As Altman reached adulthood, the family’s financial situation had become secure enough that he was able to pursue a college education. He went to the United States to study physics at the. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. While at MIT, he was a member of the ice hockey team. After achieving his bachelor’s degree from MIT in 1960, Altman spent 18 months as a graduate student in physics at. Due to personal concerns and the lack of opportunity for beginning graduate students to participate in laboratory work, he left the program without completing the degree. Some months later, he enrolled as a graduate student in biophysics at the. University of Colorado Medical Center. His project was a study of the effects of. On the replication of. He received his Ph. In biophysics from the. In 1967 with thesis advisor. Lerman went in 1967 to. Where Altman worked briefly as a researcher in molecular biology before leaving for Harvard. Altman was married to Ann M. They are the parents of two children, Daniel and Leah. Having lived primarily in the United States since departing Montreal to attend MIT in 1958, Altman became a U. Citizen in 1984, maintaining dual citizenship as a Canadian citizen as well. After receiving his Ph. Altman embarked upon the first of two research fellowships. To study a DNA. Involved in the replication and recombination of T4 DNA. Laboratory of Molecular Biology. In Cambridge, England, Altman started the work that led to the discovery of. And the enzymatic properties of the RNA subunit of that enzyme. As well as several postdoctoral colleagues, provided Altman with very good advice that enabled him to test his ideas. The discovery of the first radiochemically pure precursor to a. Molecule enabled me to get a job as an assistant professor at Yale University in 1971, a difficult time to get any job at all. Altman’s career at Yale followed a standard academic pattern with promotion through the ranks until he became Professor in 1980. He was Chairman of his department from 1983 to 1985 and in 1985 became the Dean of Yale College for four years. His doctoral students include. While at Yale, Altman’s Nobel Prize work came with the analysis of the catalytic properties of the. Particle consisting of both a structural RNA molecule and one in. Originally, it was believed that, in the bacterial RNase P complex, the protein subunit was responsible for the catalytic activity of the complex, which is involved in the maturation of tRNAs. During experiments in which the complex was reconstituted in test tubes, Altman and his group discovered that the RNA component, in isolation, was sufficient for the observed catalytic activity of the. Indicating that the RNA itself had catalytic properties, which was the discovery that earned him the Nobel Prize. Although the RNase P complex also exists in eukaryotic organisms, his later work revealed that in those organisms, the protein subunits of the complex are essential to the catalytic activity, in contrast to the bacterial RNase P. The item “RARE Nobel Prize in Chemistry Sidney Altman Hand Written Letter Dated 1995 COA” is in sale since Sunday, June 2, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Science, Inventor”. The seller is “historicsellsmemorabilia” and is located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. 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RARE Nobel Prize in Chemistry Sidney Altman Hand Written Letter Dated 1995 COA