Nobel_Prize_in_Economic_Robert_Solow_Hand_Written_2_Pg_Letter_Dated_1973_COA_01_jcqy

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Nobel Prize in Economic Robert Solow Hand Written 2 Pg Letter Dated 1973 COA

Nobel Prize in Economic Robert Solow Hand Written 2 Pg Letter Dated 1973 COA
Nobel Prize in Economic Robert Solow Hand Written 2 Pg Letter Dated 1973 COA
Nobel Prize in Economic Robert Solow Hand Written 2 Pg Letter Dated 1973 COA

Nobel Prize in Economic Robert Solow Hand Written 2 Pg Letter Dated 1973 COA
“Nobel Prize in Economic” Robert Solow Hand Written 2 Page Letter Dated 1973. This item is authenticated By Todd Mueller Autographs and comes with their certificate of authenticity. /; born August 23, 1924, is an American economist whose work on the theory of economic growth culminated in the exogenous growth model named after him. He is currently Emeritus Institute Professor of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he has been a professor since 1949. He was awarded the John Bates Clark Medal in 1961, the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in 1987, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2014. Four of his PhD students, George Akerlof, Joseph Stiglitz, Peter Diamond and William Nordhaus later received Nobel Memorial Prizes in Economic Sciences in their own right. Robert Solow was born in Brooklyn, New York, into a Jewish family on August 23, 1924, the oldest of three children. He regarded his parents as being very intelligent people but were not able to go to college due to the necessity to work. He was well educated in the neighborhood public schools and excelled academically early in life. In September 1940, Solow went to Harvard College with a scholarship at the age of 16. At Harvard, his first studies were in sociology and anthropology as well as elementary economics In 1941, Solow left the university and joined the U. Because he was fluent in German, the Army put him on a task force whose primary purpose was to intercept, interpret, and send back German messages to base. He served briefly in North Africa and Sicily, and later in Italy until he was discharged in August 1945. Shortly after returning, he proceeded to marry his girlfriend, Barbara Lewis, whom he had only been dating for six months. As Leontief’s research assistant he produced the first set of capital-coefficients for the input-output model. Then he became interested in statistics and probability models. From 1949-50, he spent a fellowship year at Columbia University to study statistics more intensively. During that year he also worked on his Ph. Thesis, an exploratory attempt to model changes in the size distribution of wage income using interacting Markov processes for employment-unemployment and wage rates. In 1949, just before going off to Columbia, he was offered and accepted an assistant professorship in the Economics Department at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He taught courses in statistics and econometrics. Solow’s interest gradually changed to macroeconomics. For almost 40 years, Solow and Paul Samuelson worked together on many landmark theories: von Neumann growth theory (1953), theory of capital (1956), linear programming (1958) and the Phillips curve (1960). Solow also held several government positions, including senior economist for the Council of Economic Advisers (1961-62) and member of the President’s Commission on Income Maintenance (1968-70). His studies focused mainly in the fields of employment and growth policies, and the theory of capital. In 1961 he won the American Economic Association’s John Bates Clark Award, given to the best economist under age forty. In 1979 he served as president of that association. In 1987, he won the Nobel Prize for his analysis of economic growth and in 1999, he received the National Medal of Science. In 2011, he received an honorary degree in Doctor of Science from Tufts University. Solow is the founder of the Cournot Foundation and the Cournot Centre. After the death of his colleague Franco Modigliani, Solow accepted an appointment as new Chairman of the I. O Institute, an Italian nonprofit cultural association which organizes international conferences and summer schools. He is a trustee of the Economists for Peace and Security. Solow’s past students include 2010 Nobel Prize winner Peter Diamond, as well as Michael Rothschild, Halbert White, Charlie Bean, Michael Woodford, and Harvey Wagner. He is ranked 23rd among economists on RePEc in terms of the strength of economists who have studied under him. Solow was one of the signees of a 2018 amici curiae brief that expressed support for Harvard University in the Students for Fair Admissions v. Signers of the brief include Alan B. Akerlof, Janet Yellen, Cecilia Rouse, along with many others. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Historical”. The seller is “historicsellsmemorabilia” and is located in this country: US. 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Nobel Prize in Economic Robert Solow Hand Written 2 Pg Letter Dated 1973 COA