Longest_Serving_MP_Charles_Pelham_Villiers_Hand_Written_Letter_Mueller_COA_01_yp

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Longest-Serving MP Charles Pelham Villiers Hand Written Letter Mueller COA

Longest-Serving MP Charles Pelham Villiers Hand Written Letter Mueller COA
Longest-Serving MP Charles Pelham Villiers Hand Written Letter Mueller COA

Longest-Serving MP Charles Pelham Villiers Hand Written Letter Mueller COA
“Longest-Serving Member of Parliament” Charles Pelham Villiers Hand Written Letter. This item is certified authentic by. And comes with their Certificate of Authenticity. (3 January 1802 – 16 January 1898) was a British lawyer and politician from the aristocratic. He sat in the. From 1835 to 1898, making him the longest-serving Member of Parliament (MP). He also holds the distinction of the oldest candidate to win a parliamentary seat, at 93. He was a radical and reformer who often collaborated with. And had a noteworthy effect in the leadership of the. Until its repeal in 1846. Lord Palmerston appointed him to the cabinet as president of the Poor-Law Board in 1859. His Public Works (Manufacturing Districts) Act of 1863 opened job-creating schemes in public health projects. He progressed numerous other reforms, most notably the Metropolitan Poor Law Act of 1867. Helped him formulate the reform, in particular, ensure professionalisation of nursing as part of the poor law regime, the workhouses of which erected public infirmaries under an Act of the same year. His political importance was overshadowed by his brother, the Earl of Clarendon, and undercut by the hostility of Gladstone. Villiers was the son of the Hon. John Parker, 1st Baron Boringdon. He was the grandson of. Thomas Villiers, 1st Earl of Clarendon. George Villiers, 4th Earl of Clarendon. He was educated at. East India Company College. St John’s College, Cambridge. He was raised to the rank of an Earl’s son in 1839 and thus entitled to be styled the Honourable Charles Pelham Villiers. Political views and enjoyed a long career in public service and Parliament. In 1832, he was a. Commissioner, and from 1833 to 1852 was an examiner of witnesses in the. Villiers was elected as a. Member of Parliament for. In each year from 1837 to 1845, he launched parliamentary debates in attempts to repeal the. In 1838, he spoke to over 5,000 “working-class men” in Manchester and told them that the presence of so large an audience gave him the proof that the working class man was with him. Into his sliding scale concession in 1842. In February 1842, Villiers was called by. MP, the solitary Robinson Crusoe standing on the barren rock of Corn Law repeal. In 1842, the majority in favour of retaining the Corn Laws had been 303, at the vote on Villiers motion in June 1845 it was down to 132. After the repeal in 1846, the press said of Villiers that he was the most persevering and undaunted supporter of those principles within the house. Villiers was a corresponding member of the. British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society. And he attended the. In London in 1840. But elected to sit for his former constituency; his election in Lancashire South was unsolicited but an honour conferred by the people there to express their gratitude for his good work with the repeal of the Corn Laws. Villiers was sworn of the. From 1852 to 1858. In 1853 the Times observed that it was Mr. Charles Villiers who practically originated the Free Trade movement. He served under Palmerston and. President of the Poor Law Board. (with a seat in the cabinet) from 1859 to 1866. In 1876 he wrote to the Manchester-based. Women’s Suffrage Journal. In which he stated, in the words of the Journal, that he had voted for the measure [suffrage] on more than one occasion, and should do so again. As far as he was acquainted with the objections usually alleged, he was bound to say they only appear to be those which have always been offered whenever any fresh extension of liberty to the subject has been proposed, and which he had himself heard urged against personal freedom in the colonies, religious liberty in this country, the enfranchisement of the working classes, and against the abolition of every monopoly, political and commercial, wherever it has been assailed. Villiers was offered a peerage in June 1885, but declined. His Wolverhampton constituency was divided under the. Redistribution of Seats Act 1885. And he was then elected for. Father of the House of Commons. From 1890 until his death in 1898. However, the last time he attended Parliament was in 1895. During his time in Parliament he worked towards. He is noted as being the voice in parliament of the free trade movement before the election of. Villiers died unmarried in January 1898, aged 96. He is buried at. A statue of him stands in West Park in. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Historical”. The seller is “historicsellsmemorabilia” and is located in this country: US. 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Longest-Serving MP Charles Pelham Villiers Hand Written Letter Mueller COA