Established Theatre as an Academic Subject Brander Matthews Hand Written Letter

Established_Theatre_as_an_Academic_Subject_Brander_Matthews_Hand_Written_Letter_01_pmg Established Theatre as an Academic Subject Brander Matthews Hand Written Letter
Established Theatre as an Academic Subject Brander Matthews Hand Written Letter

Established Theatre as an Academic Subject Brander Matthews Hand Written Letter
Established Theatre as an Academic Subject Brander Matthews Hand Written Letter Dated 1905. (February 21, 1852 – March 31, 1929) was an American writer and literary critic. He was the first full-time professor of dramatic literature at Columbia University in New York and played a significant role in establishing theater as a subject worthy of formal study by academics. His interests ranged from. To French boulevard comedies, folk theater, and the new realism of his own time. Matthews born to a wealthy family in New Orleans, grew up in New York City, and graduated from. In 1871, where he was a member of the. And the fraternity of Delta Psi, and from. He eventually began a literary career, publishing during the 1880s and 1890s short stories, novels, plays, books about drama, biographies of actors, and three books of sketches of city life. One of these, Vignettes of Manhattan (1894), was dedicated to his friend. Who later became President of the USA. From 1892 to 1900, he was a professor of literature at. And was thereafter professor of Dramatic Literature until his retirement in 1924. He was known as an engaging lecturer and a charismatic if demanding teacher. His influence was such that a popular pun claimed that an entire generation had been “brandered by the same Matthews”. During his long tenure at Columbia University, Matthews created and curated a “dramatic museum” of costumes, scripts, props, and other stage memorabilia. Housed originally in a four-room complex in. However, its books were incorporated into the university library and its dioramas of the. And other historic dramatic venues have been dispersed for public display around campus, mainly in. Matthews was the inspiration for the now-destroyed Brander Matthews Theater on 117th Street, between. An English professorship with his name still exists at Columbia. Matthews’ students knew him as a man well-versed in the history of drama and as knowledgeable about continental dramatists as he was about American and British playwrights. Long before they were fashionable, he championed playwrights who were regarded as too bold for Americans, such as. About whom he wrote frequently and eloquently. His students also knew him as an opinionated man with somewhat conservative politics. Who studied with him during 1917, recalled in his memoirs, One day I made the mistake of bringing into class a copy of [the liberal magazine]. I had, actually, a contribution in it. As a staunch Republican and intimate of Theodore Roosevelt’s, he had his duty to do. ” He could also be “easy and anecdotal, Behrman acknowledged, and he was respected on campus as a man-of-the-world He taught that performance was the main art of drama, not the literary texts of plays. Other students recalled him as a teacher who elicited “mingled affection and impatience” and who behaved in a manner that never attempted to hide his privileged life and connoisseurship. His relations with Columbia colleagues were sometimes adversarial. His conservatism became more pronounced during his later years: he was adamant about not admitting women to his graduate courses and publicly expressed the opinion that women did not have the natural ability to be great playwrights. He taught an “ancient” American literature elective that he refused to revise over the decades. Not surprisingly, he was a natural target for the World War I-era generation of writers and activists. Reviewing Matthews’ autobiography in 1917, the radical critic and fellow Columbia graduate. Complained that for Matthews, “literature was a gesture of gentility and not a comprehension of life”. In his publication On Native Grounds. Characterized him as a “literary gentleman”. Matthews taught a number of students who later had major dramatic careers, including playwright Behrman and drama critics. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Historical”. The seller is “historicsellsmemorabilia” and is located in this country: US. 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Established Theatre as an Academic Subject Brander Matthews Hand Written Letter