RARE! Ornithologist Arthur Cleveland Bent Hand Written Letter Todd Mueller COA

RARE_Ornithologist_Arthur_Cleveland_Bent_Hand_Written_Letter_Todd_Mueller_COA_01_cies RARE! Ornithologist Arthur Cleveland Bent Hand Written Letter Todd Mueller COA
RARE! Ornithologist Arthur Cleveland Bent Hand Written Letter Todd Mueller COA
RARE! Ornithologist Arthur Cleveland Bent Hand Written Letter Todd Mueller COA

RARE! Ornithologist Arthur Cleveland Bent Hand Written Letter Todd Mueller COA
“Ornithologist” Arthur Cleveland Bent Hand Written Letter Dated 1929. This item is certified authentic by Todd Mueller and comes with their Certificate of Authenticity. (November 25, 1866 December 30, 1954) was an. Bent was brought up in. Where he became interested in birds as a child. He was later successful in business and traveled throughout North America, acquiring an extensive knowledge of its avifauna. From 1901 he was contributing papers to. The journal of the. Following a request from the. In 1910, Bent started work on the project that would dominate the rest of his life. Using his own experiences, the published literature, and contributions from hundreds of others, he put together what was at the time by far the most comprehensive repository of knowledge about the biology of the birds of North America. His accounts were published progressively in the United States National Museum Bulletin (NMB). And later republished by. In 1940 Bent was awarded the. For distinguished book-length nature writing. He was awarded the. Daniel Giraud Elliot Medal. National Academy of Sciences. The item “RARE! Ornithologist Arthur Cleveland Bent Hand Written Letter Todd Mueller COA” is in sale since Saturday, February 23, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Science, Inventor”. The seller is “historicsellsmemorabilia” and is located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, South africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi arabia, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa rica, Panama, Trinidad and tobago, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Viet nam, Uruguay.
RARE! Ornithologist Arthur Cleveland Bent Hand Written Letter Todd Mueller COA
in rare | 289 Words

Field & Stream Henry Sumner Watson Hand Written Letter Dated 1927 Mueller COA

Field_Stream_Henry_Sumner_Watson_Hand_Written_Letter_Dated_1927_Mueller_COA_01_gi Field & Stream Henry Sumner Watson Hand Written Letter Dated 1927 Mueller COA
Field & Stream Henry Sumner Watson Hand Written Letter Dated 1927 Mueller COA
Field & Stream Henry Sumner Watson Hand Written Letter Dated 1927 Mueller COA

Field & Stream Henry Sumner Watson Hand Written Letter Dated 1927 Mueller COA
This item is certified authentic by Todd Mueller and comes with their Certificate of Authenticity. Henry Watson (Hy Watson aka Henry Sumner Watson) was an illustrator; he worked for ” Field & Stream” and “Scribner’s Magazine” in the early 1900s. The item “Field & Stream Henry Sumner Watson Hand Written Letter Dated 1927 Mueller COA” is in sale since Tuesday, April 23, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Historical”. The seller is “historicsellsmemorabilia” and is located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, South africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi arabia, Ukraine, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa rica, Dominican republic, Panama, Trinidad and tobago, Guatemala, El salvador, Honduras, Jamaica, Antigua and barbuda, Aruba, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Saint kitts and nevis, Saint lucia, Montserrat, Turks and caicos islands, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Brunei darussalam, Bolivia, Ecuador, Egypt, French guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Cayman islands, Liechtenstein, Sri lanka, Luxembourg, Monaco, Macao, Martinique, Maldives, Nicaragua, Oman, Peru, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Viet nam, Uruguay.
Field & Stream Henry Sumner Watson Hand Written Letter Dated 1927 Mueller COA

Hand Written Letter Signed by John Quincy Adams Laws of the United States

Hand_Written_Letter_Signed_by_John_Quincy_Adams_Laws_of_the_United_States_01_crry Hand Written Letter Signed by John Quincy Adams Laws of the United States
Hand Written Letter Signed by John Quincy Adams Laws of the United States
Hand Written Letter Signed by John Quincy Adams Laws of the United States
Hand Written Letter Signed by John Quincy Adams Laws of the United States

Hand Written Letter Signed by John Quincy Adams Laws of the United States
This listing is for a hand written letter from the Department of State dated October 18, 1817. It was most likely written by a secretary and hand by John Quincy Adams who had recently took over as Secretary of State. The letter is framed and appears to be in excellent condition. The item “Hand Written Letter Signed by John Quincy Adams Laws of the United States” is in sale since Friday, April 5, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Political\Presidential”. The seller is “chamberlaindiscovery” and is located in Amherst, New Hampshire. This item can be shipped worldwide.
Hand Written Letter Signed by John Quincy Adams Laws of the United States
in hand | 97 Words

William Hartnell (the First Dr. Who / Doctor Who) Signed 1953 Hand Written Letter

William_Hartnell_the_First_Dr_Who_Doctor_Who_Signed_1953_Hand_Written_Letter_01_ldj William Hartnell (the First Dr. Who / Doctor Who) Signed 1953 Hand Written Letter
William Hartnell (the First Dr. Who / Doctor Who) Signed 1953 Hand Written Letter
William Hartnell (the First Dr. Who / Doctor Who) Signed 1953 Hand Written Letter
William Hartnell (the First Dr. Who / Doctor Who) Signed 1953 Hand Written Letter
William Hartnell (the First Dr. Who / Doctor Who) Signed 1953 Hand Written Letter

William Hartnell (the First Dr. Who / Doctor Who) Signed 1953 Hand Written Letter
SCARCE AND WONDERFUL OPPORTUNITY TO OBTAIN A FULLY AUTHENTICATED WILLIAM HARTNELL SIGNED LETTER. (8 January 1908 23 April 1975) was an English actor. From 1963 to 1966. He was also well known for his role as Sergeant Grimshaw, the title character of the first. In 1958, and Company Sergeant Major Percy Bullimore in the sitcom. From 1957 until 1958, and again in 1960. DON’T MISS IT! The item “WILLIAM HARTNELL (THE FIRST DR. WHO / DOCTOR WHO) SIGNED 1953 HAND WRITTEN LETTER” is in sale since Monday, April 22, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectables\Autographs\Certified Original Autographs\TV”. The seller is “darrel62″ and is located in Manchester. This item can be shipped to North, South, or Latin America, all countries in Europe, all countries in continental Asia, Australia.
  • Surname Initial: H
  • Certification: Certified: Private Signings
  • Type: Television
  • Sub-Type: Dr Who
  • Object: SIGNED LETTER

William Hartnell (the First Dr. Who / Doctor Who) Signed 1953 Hand Written Letter

RARE! Air Rifles Henry Quackenbush Hand Written Letter Dated 1892 Mueller COA

RARE_Air_Rifles_Henry_Quackenbush_Hand_Written_Letter_Dated_1892_Mueller_COA_01_nhay RARE! Air Rifles Henry Quackenbush Hand Written Letter Dated 1892 Mueller COA
RARE! Air Rifles Henry Quackenbush Hand Written Letter Dated 1892 Mueller COA
RARE! Air Rifles Henry Quackenbush Hand Written Letter Dated 1892 Mueller COA

RARE! Air Rifles Henry Quackenbush Hand Written Letter Dated 1892 Mueller COA
“Air Rifles” Henry Quackenbush Hand Written Letter Dated 1892. This item is certified authentic by Todd Mueller and comes with their Certificate of Authenticity. (April 27, 1847 September 8, 1933), commonly called H. His company was widely known for its. And for the invention of the metal, spring-jointed. Quackenbush was born in. Where he acquired skills as a metalworker and gunmaker. At the age of 16, he invented the. Which he patented on Oct. In 1871, he founded the Quackenbush Company in. And obtained his first air gun patent (issued June 6, 1871) for his Eureka air pistol. The pistol is now a collectors item. The company began producing air rifles in 1876. Their spring/air design, as well as the steam-powered manufacturing plant itself, were considered to be innovative at the time. In the 1880s, they began mass production of so-called “gallery guns”. And the Quackenbush name appeared in. Throughout the United States. The company went on to play a key role in the standardization of. And to produce many models of their very popular. In 1913, Quackenbush invented the spring-jointed. And a nutpick, designs still in wide use today. Over the years, his company produced over 200 million, and metal nutcrackers seen today stamped with the. “HMQ” or “QBC” were those made by the Quackenbush. The company stopped making air guns in the 1930s, but continued making nutpicks and nutcrackers. The company also developed and manufactured many other products over the years — ranging from rifles and sport firearms to kitchen gadgets and seafood tools. Quackenbush and his company were responsible for inventing, or significantly contributing to the development of, numerous early 20th century inventions, including: bicycles; a foot-powered wood lathe; the scroll saw; darts; stair rails; the extension ladder; a bathroom shelf; the nut cracker and picks; the. 22 caliber rimfire rifle (3 models, including a bicycle rifle); various air rifles and pistols; ammunition for airguns, including lead air rifle shot (commonly known as “BBs”), felted slugs; the. And garment hangers (“coat hangers”). N addition to the items he invented and manufactured, Quackenbush also had to invent the machinery needed to produce the items, which included many innovative manufacturing techniques and methods. The item “RARE! Air Rifles Henry Quackenbush Hand Written Letter Dated 1892 Mueller COA” is in sale since Saturday, April 20, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Science, Inventor”. The seller is “historicsellsmemorabilia” and is located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, South africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi arabia, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa rica, Panama, Trinidad and tobago, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Viet nam, Uruguay.
RARE! Air Rifles Henry Quackenbush Hand Written Letter Dated 1892 Mueller COA
in rare | 474 Words

1810s THOMAS MOORE ALS Autograph HANDWRITTEN LETTER Irish IRELAND Poet SINGER

1810s_THOMAS_MOORE_ALS_Autograph_HANDWRITTEN_LETTER_Irish_IRELAND_Poet_SINGER_01_oplg 1810s THOMAS MOORE ALS Autograph HANDWRITTEN LETTER Irish IRELAND Poet SINGER

1810s THOMAS MOORE ALS Autograph HANDWRITTEN LETTER Irish IRELAND Poet SINGER
Wonderful handwritten letter from Irish poet Thomas Moore; postmarks (one looks like Piccadilly). Appears to be addressed to a Sir Charles Boyle or Doyle. Postmark date hard to read – possibly 1817? Thomas Moore (28 May 1779 25 February 1852) was an Irish poet, singer, songwriter, and entertainer, now best remembered for the lyrics of “The Minstrel Boy” and “The Last Rose of Summer”. He was responsible, with John Murray, for burning Lord Byron’s memoirs after his death. In his lifetime he was often referred to as Anacreon Moore. From a relatively early age Moore showed an interest in music and other performing arts. He sometimes appeared in musical plays with his friends, such as The Poor Soldier by John O’Keeffe (music by William Shield), and at one point had ambitions to become an actor. [1] Moore attended several Dublin schools including Samuel Whyte’s English Grammar School in Grafton Street where he learned the English accent with which he spoke for the rest of his life. [2] In 1795 he graduated from Trinity College, which had recently allowed entry to Catholic students, in an effort to fulfill his mother’s dream of him becoming a lawyer. Moore was initially a good student, but he later put less effort into his studies. His time at Trinity came amidst the ongoing turmoil following the French Revolution, and a number of his fellow students such as Robert Emmet were supporters of the United Irishmen movement, although Moore himself never was a member. [3] This movement sought support from the French government to launch a revolution in Ireland. In 1798 a rebellion broke out followed by a French invasion, neither of which succeeded. Besides Emmet, another formative influence was Edward Hudson, also a fellow student at Trinity College, who played a crucial role in introducing Moore to Edward Bunting’s A General Collection of the Ancient Irish Music (1797), later one of the main sources of his own collection of Irish Melodies. Thomas Moore was born at 12 Aungier Street in Dublin, Ireland. [5] over his father’s grocery shop, his father being from the Kerry Gaeltacht and his mother, Anastasia Codd, from Wexford. He had two younger sisters, Kate and Ellen. [6] Moore attended several Dublin schools including Samuel Whyte’s English Grammar School in Grafton Street where he learned the English accent with which he spoke for the rest of his life. [7] In 1795 he graduated from Trinity College, which had recently allowed entry to Catholic students, in an effort to fulfill his mother’s dream of him becoming a lawyer. [8] This movement sought support from the French government to launch a revolution in Ireland. Besides Emmet, another formative influence was Edward Hudson, also a fellow student at Trinity College, who played a crucial role in introducing Moore to Edward Bunting’s A General Collection of the Ancient Irish Music (1797), later one the main sources of his own collection of Irish Melodies. The soldier and politician Lord Moira was a major early patron of Moore. For many years Moore hoped his connection with him would lead to public office but he was ultimately disappointed. In 1799 he travelled to London to study law at Middle Temple. He was helped in this by his friends in the expatriate Irish community in London, including Barbara, widow of Arthur Chichester, 1st Marquess of Donegall. She and her sister became his lifelong friends. However, it was as a poet, translator, balladeer and singer that he found fame. His work soon became immensely popular and included “The Harp That Once Through Taras Halls”, “Believe Me, if All Those Endearing Young Charms”, “The Meeting of the Waters” and many other specimens from his collections of Irish Melodies. Often simply called “Moore’s Melodies”, they were originally published between 1808 and 1834 (see below). But Moore was far more than a balladeer. He had major success as a society figure in London, meeting the Prince of Wales on several occasions and enjoying in particular the patronage of the Irish aristocrat Lord Moira. Moore stayed repeatedly at Moira’s house at Donnington Park in Leicestershire where he enjoyed the extensive library. He also collaborated with Michael Kelly and Charles Edward Horn in staging operas to his librettos in 1801 and 1811. North America In 1803 he was appointed registrar to the Admiralty in Bermuda. He spent around three months on the island, but he found his work very light and uninspiring. There were several other prize courts nearby and very few captured ships were brought to Bermuda leaving him little to do. Although he drew inspiration from the scenery of Bermuda he found its society limited and soon departed for Norfolk in Virginia. [11] Because of his brief stay there, he has sometimes been treated as an unofficial poet laureate of Bermuda. [12] His “Ode to Nea” caused something of a scandal since the language suggested a love affair and local gossip, rightly or wrongly, identified Nea with Hester Tucker, the young wife of one of his colleagues. From Norfolk he travelled across the United States and Canada in a Grand Tour. During this visit Moore developed a deeply critical view of the United States. He particularly disliked the governing Democratic-Republican Party and the President Thomas Jefferson. While in Washington he stayed with Anthony Merry, the British ambassador, and met Jefferson briefly: the meeting had a touch of farce since the President apparently mistook Moore, an exceptionally small man, for a child. He then travelled through various American towns and cities, enjoying his time most in Philadelphia where he already had an established reputation. He then travelled northwards to British-controlled Canada, stopping at the Niagara Falls. In Montreal, he was invited to dine at the Beaver Club. At Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue he wrote one of his most famous works, the “Canadian Boat Song”. Lord Jeffrey whom Moore nearly fought in a duel in 1806 after a bad review of his work. The circumstances of the aborted duel led to public ridicule of Moore, although he later became friends with Jeffrey. It was after this trip that he published his book Epistles, Odes, and Other Poems, which featured a paean to the historic Cohoes Falls called Lines Written at the Cohos [sic], or Falls of the Mohawk River, among other famous verses. A repeated theme in his writing on the United States were his observations of the institution of slavery. Moore’s mocking criticisms of the United States provoked outrage in America and led to a number of rebuttals. [14] In Britain, a critical review of the work led to Moore challenging Francis Jeffrey, an editor, to a duel. They met at Chalk Farm but the duel was interrupted by the arrival of the authorities and they were arrested. Reports that Moore’s opponent had been given an empty pistol continued to dog Moore and led to persistent mockery of him. Lord Byron derisively referred to Moore’s “leadless pistol” and wrote: “on examination, the balls of the pistols, like the courage of the combatants, were found to have evaporated”. [16] Moore was angered by this and sent a letter to Byron that hinted that unless the remarks were clarified Moore was prepared to fight Byron. However, Byron had left Britain to travel abroad and the letter did not reach him. When the two men eventually met each other the dispute was settled and they soon became very close friends. Between 1808 and 1810 Moore appeared each year with the Kilkenny Players in a charitable series of performances in Kilkenny staged by a mixture of the Irish elite and professional actors. Moore appeared frequently in comic roles in plays like Sheridan’s The Rivals and O’Keeffe’s The Castle of Andalusia. Moore married an actress, Elizabeth “Bessy” Dyke, younger sister of tragedienne-to-be Mary Ann Duff, in 1811, whom he had met with the Kilkenny players where she was working with her sisters. [19] She was the daughter of an East India Company official, but was raised with her two sisters by her mother. Moore did not initially tell his parents of his marriage, possibly because his wife was an English Protestant, but more probably because his marriage to a woman without a dowry would not help his financial prospects. His marriage was generally judged to be very happy, although Bessy shrank from fashionable society to such an extent that many of her husband’s friends never met her (some of them jokingly doubted her very existence); those who did meet her nearly all had a high regard for her. “The Last Rose of Summer” MENU0:00 sung by Adelina Patti in 1906 Problems playing this file? In the early years of his career, Moore’s work was largely generic and had he died at this point he would likely not have been considered an Irish poet. [20] From 1806 to 1807 Moore dramatically changed his style of writing and focus. Following a request by the publishers James and William Power, he wrote lyrics to a series of Irish tunes in the manner of Haydn’s settings of British folksongs, with Sir John Andrew Stevenson as arranger of the music. They were originally published in ten volumes and a supplement between 1808 and 1834, the musical arrangements of the last volumes after Stevenson’s death (1833) being done by Henry Bishop. Moore became best known for these Irish Melodies, which were enormously popular, containing songs such as “The Minstrel Boy”, “The Last Rose of Summer”, “Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms” and “Oft in the Stilly Night”. Several examples of his music, such as Farewell! But Whenever You Welcome the Hour are available online. There was never a collected volume of Moore’s Melodies in his lifetime, but many appeared not long afterwards. Some of them were made by Irish composers wanting to improve the accompaniments of Stevenson, which were often considered too simple or not appropriate to the songs. Among these were arrangements by Michael William Balfe London: Novello & Co. 1859, John William Glover (Dublin: James Duffy, 1859), Francis Robinson Jr. (Dublin: Robinson & Bussell, 1863) and John Liptrot Hatton London: Novello & Co. Other works In 1811 Moore wrote M. A comic opera, in collaboration with Charles Edward Horn. Although it received positive reviews Moore didn’t enjoy writing for the stage and decided not to work in the medium again despite being occasionally tempted. [22] Throughout the 1810s Moore wrote a number of political satires. After originally being a devoted supporter of the Prince of Wales, he turned against him after 1811 when he became Prince Regent and was seen to embrace the Tory government in spite of his past association with the Whigs. Another major target was the Foreign Secretary Lord Castlereagh who was repeatedly lampooned in Moore’s works such as Tom Crib’s Memorial to Congress which parodied the Aix-la-Chapelle diplomatic conference between Britain and her Allies portraying it as a boxing match. [23] In 1818 Moore wrote The Fudge Family in Paris, a story in which a British family travels to experience the sights of Paris; a sequel, The Fudge Family in England, followed in 1835. Around this time Moore also began working on a biography of the playwright and politician Richard Brinsley Sheridan, whom he met numerous times, but partly due to legal reasons it was not published until 1825. In company with Lord John Russell he went to the Continent and after a Grand Tour through France, Switzerland and Italy lived in Paris until 1822 (notably with the family of Martin de Villamil), when the debt was finally paid off partly with the help of his latest patron Lord Lansdowne and with an advance given him by his publisher Longmans. During his travels across Europe he briefly spent time with Lord Byron in Venice: this was to be their last meeting. Byron gave Moore his memoirs with instruction to publish them after his death as a literary executor. Moore was much criticised later for allowing himself to be persuaded to destroy Byron’s memoirs at the behest of Byron’s family because of their damningly honest content. Moore did, however, edit and publish Letters and Journals of Lord Byron, with Notices of his Life in 1830, six years after Byron’s death in Greece. After returning to Britain, Moore published new poetry, but in spite of good reviews and good sales he was growing disillusioned with writing poetry and he began to consider writing novels, a genre made increasingly popular by the success of Walter Scott. In October 1825 Moore’s Memoirs of the Life of Richard Brinsley Sheridan was finally published after nine years of work on and off. It proved very popular, went through a number of editions quickly and helped give Moore a more serious reputation among his literary contemporaries. Thomas Moore, after a painting by Thomas Lawrence He finally settled in Sloperton Cottage at Bromham, Wiltshire, England, and became a novelist and biographer as well as a successful poet. Around the time of the Reform Act he was invited to stand for parliament, and considered it, but nothing came of it. [25] In 1829 he was painted by Thomas Lawrence, one of the last works completed by the artist before his death. [26] In 1830 he sang in front of the future Queen Victoria in a duet with her mother, and later composed the song “Sovereign Woman” in her honour. Moore was for many years a strong advocate for Catholic Emancipation; he regarded its absence as the source of all problems in Ireland and the sole reason behind the 1798 rebellion a point he made in his 1831 biography Life and Death of Lord Edward Fitzgerald. [28] However, he experienced a difficult relationship with the leader of the Catholic Association Daniel O’Connell whom Moore regarded as a demagogue, believing “O’Connell and his ragamuffins have brought tarnish upon Irish patriotism”. [29] Following the passing of the Catholic Relief Act in 1829 Moore believed his involvement in politics terminated, joking to a friend: “Now that the Paddies are happy I consider my politics entirely at an end”. [30] However, he was drawn back into politics by a series of democratic rebellions across Europe in Belgium, France and Poland. [31] Moore had also been a sympathiser with the Greeks in their War of Independence, a passion he shared with his friend Byron. He received a state pension, but his personal life was dogged by tragedy including the deaths of all his five children within his lifetime Anne, age 5, d. 1817; Anastasia Mary, age 17, d. 1829; Olivia as a baby of a few months of age; John Russell, aged 19, d. 1842; and Thomas Lansdowne, aged 27, d. 1849 and a stroke in later life, which disabled him from performances the activity for which he was most renowned. Moore died being cared for by his wife at Sloperton on 26 February 1852. His remains are in a vault at St. Nicholas churchyard, Bromham, within view of his cottage-home, beside his daughter Anastasia. Moore was a frequent visitor to Lord Henry Fitzgerald property at Thames Ditton, Boyle Farm, and the premises were incorporated into Moore’s long poem, The Summer Fête. A bust of Thomas Moore at the Meeting of the Waters. New York Moore is often considered Ireland’s national bard[citation needed] and is to Ireland what Robert Burns is to Scotland. Moore is commemorated in several places: by a plaque on the house where he was born, by busts at The Meetings and Central Park, New York, and by a bronze statue near Trinity College Dublin. There is a road in Walkinstown, Dublin, named Thomas Moore Road, in a series of roads named after famous composers, locally referred to as the Musical Roads. Many composers have set the poems of Thomas Moore to music. They include Gaspare Spontini, Robert Schumann, Hector Berlioz, Charles Ives, William Bolcom, Lori Laitman, Benjamin Britten and Henri Duparc. The song “Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms” is often used in a famous gag in a number of Warner Brothers cartoons, usually involving a piano or Xylophone rigged to explode when a certain note is played. The hero, typically Bugs Bunny, tries to play the melody line of the song, but always misses the rigged note (C above middle C). The villain or rival, finally exasperated, pushes the hero aside and plays the song himself, striking the correct note and blowing himself up. In one instance, however, the protagonist plays the melody on a xylophone and, upon striking the rigged note, the antagonist explodes in an old gag, new twist. ” Many songs of Thomas Moore are cited in works of James Joyce, for example “Silent, O Moyle” in Two Gallants (Dubliners)[33] or “The Last Rose of Summer. Oliver Onions quotes Moore’s poem “Oft in the Stilly Night” in his 1910 ghost story “The Cigarette Case”. [34] List of works. Stained glass at Ottawa Public Library features Charles Dickens, Archibald Lampman, Duncan Campbell Scott, Lord Byron, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, William Shakespeare, Thomas Moore. (1801) The Gypsy Prince (a comic opera, collaboration with Michael Kelly, 1801) Epistles, Odes and Other Poems (1806) A Selection of Irish Melodies, 1 and 2 (April 1808) Corruption and Intolerance, Two Poems (1808) The Sceptic: A Philosophical Satire (1809) A Selection of Irish Melodies, 3 (spring 1810) A Letter to the Roman Catholics of Dublin (1810) A Melologue upon National Music (1811) M. Or The Blue Stocking, (a comic opera, collaboration with Charles Edward Horn, 1811) A Selection of Irish Melodies, 4 (November 1811) Parody of a Celebrated Letter (Privately printed and circulated, February 1812, Examiner, 8 March 1812) To a Plumassier (Morning Chronicle, 16 March 1812) Extracts from the Diary of a Fashionable Politician (Morning Chronicle, 30 March 1812) The Insurrection of the Papers (Morning Chronicle, 23 April 1812) Lines on the Death of Mr. Of Dublin (25 September 1818) Go, Brothers in Wisdom (Morning Chronicle, 18 August 1818) A Selection of Irish Melodies, 7 (1 October 1818) To Sir Hudson Lowe (Examiner, 4 October 1818) The Works of Thomas Moore 6 vols. (1819) Tom Crib’s Memorial to Congress (March 1819) National Airs, 2 (1820) Irish Melodies, with a Melologue upon National Music (1820) A Selection of Irish Melodies, 8 (on or around 10 May 1821) Irish Melodies (with an Appendix, containing the original advertisements and the prefatory letter on music, 1821) National Airs, 3 (June 1822) National Airs, 4 (1822) The Loves of the Angels, a Poem (23 December 1822) The Loves of the Angels, an Eastern Romance 5th ed. Of Loves of the Angels (1823) Fables for the Holy Alliance, Rhymes on the Road, &c. (7 May 1823) Sacred Songs, 2 (1824) A Selection of Irish Melodies, 9 (1 November 1824) Memoirs of Captain Rock (9 April 1824) Memoirs of the Life of Richard Brinsley Sheridan 2 vols. (1825, on or around 6 October) National Airs, 5 (1826) Evenings in Greece, 1 (1826) A Dream of Turtle (The Times, 28 September 1826) A Set of Glees (circa 9 June 1827) The Epicurean, a Tale (29 June 1827) National Airs, 6 (1827) Odes upon Cash, Corn, Catholics, and other Matters (October 1828) Letters & Journals of Lord Byron, with Notices of his Life vol. 1 (15 January 1830) Legendary Ballads (1830) Letters & Journals of Lord Byron, with Notices of his Life vol. 2 (on or around 29 December 1830) The Life and Death of Lord Edward FitzGerald 2 vols. (between 15 and 22 July 1831) The Summer Fête. A Poem with Songs (December 1831) Irish Antiquities (The Times, 5 March 1832) From the Hon. Henry —, to Lady Emma — (The Times, 9 April 1832) To Caroline, Viscountess Valletort (The Metropolitan Magazine, June 1832) Ali’s Bride… (The Metropolitan Magazine, August 1832) Verses to the Poet Crabbe’s Inkstand (The Metropolitan Magazine, August 1832) Tory Pledges (The Times, 30 August 1832) Song to the Departing Spirit of Tithe (The Metropolitan Magazine, September 1832) The Duke is the Lad (The Times, 2 October 1832) St. Jerome on Earth, First Visit (The Times, 29 October 1832) St. Jerome on Earth, Second Visit (The Times, 12 November 1832) Evenings in Greece, 2 (December 1832) Travels of an Irish Gentleman in Search of a Religion 2 vols. (April 1833) To the Rev. Charles Overton (The Times, 6 November 1833) Irish Melodies, 10 (with Supplement) (1834) Vocal Miscellany, 1 (1834) The Numbering of the Clergy (Examiner, 5 October 1834) Vocal Miscellany, 2 (1835) The poetical works of Thomas Moore, complete in two volumes, Paris, Baudry’s European library (rue du Coq, near the Louvre), 1835 The Fudge Family in England (1835) The History of Ireland vol. 1 (on or around 23 April 1835) The History of Ireland vol. 2 (6 May 1837) The Song of the Box (Morning Chronicle, 19 February 1838) Sketch of the First Act of a New Romantic Drama (Morning Chronicle, 22 March 1838) Thoughts on Patrons, Puffs, and Other Matters (Bentley’s Miscellany, 1839) Alciphron, a Poem (1839) The History of Ireland vol. 3 (1840) The Poetical Works of Thomas Moore, collected by himself 10 vols. (18401841) Thoughts on Mischief (Morning Chronicle, 2 May 1840) Religion and Trade (Morning Chronicle, 1 June 1840) An Account of an Extraordinary Dream (Morning Chronicle, 15 June 1840) The Retreat of the Scorpion (Morning Chronicle, 16 July 1840) Musings, suggested by the Late Promotion of Mrs. Nethercoat (Morning Chronicle, 27 August 1840) The Triumphs of Farce (1840) Latest Accounts from Olympus (1840) A Threnody on the Approaching Demise of Old Mother Corn-Law (Morning Chronicle, 23 February 1842) Sayings and Doings of Ancient Nicholas (Morning Chronicle, 7 April 1842)”More Sayings and Doings of Ancient Nicholas (Morning Chronicle, 12 May 1842) The History of Ireland vol. 4 (June 1846) Prose and verse, humorous, satirical and sentimental, by Thomas Moore, with suppressed passages from the memoirs of Lord Byron, chiefly from the author’s manuscript and all hitherto inedited and uncollected. With notes and introduction by Richard Herne Shepherd (London: Chatto & Windus, Piccadilly, 1878). Thank you for looking at our items! Chestnut Hill Books ships to every country in the world at reasonable rates as suggested by the United States Postal Service. Postcards are mailed between sturdy cardboard. We strive to describe each item completely and accurately. Should you have any question about the condition or representation of your item. Chestnut Hill Books is a family-owned antiques business based out of the SouthCoast, Massachusetts. We collect historical items related to New Bedford, Massachusetts and the surrounding area (Dartmouth, Fairhaven, Westport etc), Boston College (tickets, programs, pennants, postcards, scrapbooks, pinbacks, sports & non-sports etc), Massachusetts political buttons & memorabilia and Mount Monadnock in Jaffrey, New Hampshire. We normally respond to all inquiries in a timely manner. Thank you for looking at our listings! The item “1810s THOMAS MOORE ALS Autograph HANDWRITTEN LETTER Irish IRELAND Poet SINGER” is in sale since Tuesday, March 26, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Historical”. The seller is “chestnuthillbooks” and is located in New Bedford, Massachusetts. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Signed by: Thomas Moore

1810s THOMAS MOORE ALS Autograph HANDWRITTEN LETTER Irish IRELAND Poet SINGER

Jacqueline Kennedy Hand-Written 1963 Letter, Dr. Travell, Inaugural Poetry Book

Jacqueline_Kennedy_Hand_Written_1963_Letter_Dr_Travell_Inaugural_Poetry_Book_01_tym Jacqueline Kennedy Hand-Written 1963 Letter, Dr. Travell, Inaugural Poetry Book

Jacqueline Kennedy Hand-Written 1963 Letter, Dr. Travell, Inaugural Poetry Book
Your Passion Is Our Promise Authentic Autographs, Fine Art & Antiquities. (JG Autographs watermark does not appear on the actual item, only our online scan). Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis (July 28, 1929 – May 19, 1994), wife of the 35th President of the United States, John F. Kennedy, and First Lady of the United States, hand-written letter as First Lady, to her secretary Mary Gahhagher. 1 Have foujnd Inaug. Poets book (it’s on your desk). Paste in new page at end & return it to my desk please – thanks. 2 Will you tell Dr. Travell I can’t see Dr. As that is Caroline’s school play – She can make it Tues. That week – Tell me which – same time. 3 Will you return those color paintings/pics & folders to Heim in Paris – I will write them under separate cover. A full page hand written letter on official White House stationary, 5 x 8 in size. More About Us And Our Commitment To You. Has been a leader in the autograph field since the mid 1990s. From the beginning, the idea was simple: sell top-quality, 100% authentic autographs and fine collectibles. Today, nearly twenty years after the founding of JG Autographs, we continue our commitment to provide you with the finest authentic Autographs, Art & Antiquities. Is a leader in providing authentic autographed items and memorabilia to private collectors, dealers and galleries all over the world. Our impeccable reputation stands behind our products and company. At JG Autographs, Inc. Every autograph comes with our lifetime Letter of Authenticity (LOA / COA) stating our guarantee that, for the lifetime of the item, we stand behind the authenticity of the item. Our Letter of Authenticity takes that guarantee one step further by containing an image(s) of the exact item which the letter is accompanies. Each LOA is hand signed by our President. Collectively, these measures prevent the misuse of our LOAs and protect the integrity of our authentic autographs we sell. Accompanied by our LOA will maintain the respect they deserve in regard to any and all future concerns on authenticity. The Uniqueness of Our Products. We carry a broad range of products in hundreds of varying categories of collecting. Our category diversity includes film and television, military, models, music, notables, politics, science, space and aviation, sports and the arts. Whether you are a history buff, fan of modern film, television, art or music or enjoy collecting material from your favorite home town team or sports legends, we carry it all. Our collectibles make for fantastic additions to long standing collections, great starting points for new collectors looking for trusted authentic material, and make for a truly unique gifts for that special person in your life or corporate gift for a special client. We do not sell reproductions of autographs. All autographed items, as well as our fine vintage collectibles, come with a Full Letter of Authenticity. All prices are firm. We do not discount prices on a per request, per customer basis. We offer a 100% satisfaction guarantee. We are registered dealer #147 in good standing with the UACC. The item “Jacqueline Kennedy Hand-Written 1963 Letter, Dr. Travell, Inaugural Poetry Book” is in sale since Wednesday, March 27, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Historical Memorabilia\Political\US\Presidents & First Ladies\1961-63 John F. Kennedy”. The seller is “jgautographs” and is located in Boston, MA, United States. This item can be shipped worldwide.
Jacqueline Kennedy Hand-Written 1963 Letter, Dr. Travell, Inaugural Poetry Book

Sir Alfred Munnings. Autograph. Handwritten letter. AFTAL DEALER

Sir_Alfred_Munnings_Autograph_Handwritten_letter_AFTAL_DEALER_01_uy Sir Alfred Munnings. Autograph. Handwritten letter. AFTAL DEALER
Sir Alfred Munnings. Autograph. Handwritten letter. AFTAL DEALER
Sir Alfred Munnings. Autograph. Handwritten letter. AFTAL DEALER
Sir Alfred Munnings. Autograph. Handwritten letter. AFTAL DEALER
Sir Alfred Munnings. Autograph. Handwritten letter. AFTAL DEALER
Sir Alfred Munnings. Autograph. Handwritten letter. AFTAL DEALER
Sir Alfred Munnings. Autograph. Handwritten letter. AFTAL DEALER
Sir Alfred Munnings. Autograph. Handwritten letter. AFTAL DEALER

Sir Alfred Munnings. Autograph. Handwritten letter. AFTAL DEALER
AFTAL dealer Deeming Autographs presents: Sir Alfred Munnings, a signed handwritten letter, 9 x 7 inches, on his own headed paper. In it he thanks his correspondent for his note and cheque and discusses an order he has received for four sporting paintings. Also included are two, unsigned, b/w photos, one 10 x 8 inches and showing him at work in his studio, the other 8 x 6 inches and showing him posing with some of his works. Sir Alfred Munnings, renowned English artist, one of the finest painters of horses. Condition note: The letter has some creasing and small tears to the borders, see photos. Folds where the letter has been folded for insertion into envelope. Deeming Autographs are AFTAL approved dealer number 74. We only collect and sell genuine hand signed autographs, we do not deal in autopens, pre prints, stamps or fakes. As knowledgeable collectors, authenticators and dealers in autographs, we only source our stock from the most reputable auctions houses, dealers and collectors. That, along with our experience, is our guarantee to you of authenticity and the highest standard of service. As collectors we operate the kind of business that we would want to deal with. All of our signed items come with a lifetime guarantee of authenticity and COA. The item “Sir Alfred Munnings. Autograph. Handwritten letter. AFTAL DEALER” is in sale since Thursday, January 17, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectables\Autographs\Certified Original Autographs\Other Certified Originals”. The seller is “deemauto” and is located in Staindrop. This item can be shipped to all countries in Europe, United States, Japan, Canada, Australia.
  • Modified Item: No
  • Type: Artist
  • Object: Handwritten letter

Sir Alfred Munnings. Autograph. Handwritten letter. AFTAL DEALER

Duke Clarence King William IV Handwritten Signed Autograph Letter 1822 Ecuador

Duke_Clarence_King_William_IV_Handwritten_Signed_Autograph_Letter_1822_Ecuador_01_zrtw Duke Clarence King William IV Handwritten Signed Autograph Letter 1822 Ecuador
Duke Clarence King William IV Handwritten Signed Autograph Letter 1822 Ecuador
Duke Clarence King William IV Handwritten Signed Autograph Letter 1822 Ecuador

Duke Clarence King William IV Handwritten Signed Autograph Letter 1822 Ecuador
Bibelotslondon Ltd is a UK registered company based in London Bridge dealing in ephemera and curiosities from Britain and around the world. Our diverse inventory is carefully chosen and constantly evolving. We work very hard to offer the highest quality works at competitive prices. Our inventory is listed online, and we strive to keep our website completely up to date, so our customers can easily check availability. We believe in offering clients items that are unique and rare for aficionados of the antique and collector’s world. Bibelot is a late nineteenth century word derived from the French word bel beautiful, meaning a small item of beauty, curiosity or interest. The word ephemera is derived from the sixteenth century Greek word ephmera meaning a printed or hand written paper not meant to be retained for a long period of time. Fine and rare handwritten and signed watermarked letter from the Duke of Clarence later King William IV (William Henry; 21 August 1765 20 June 1837). He was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of Hanover from 26 June 1830 until his death. In this letter the Duke refers to the Ecuadorian War of Independence fought from 1820 to 1822 between several South American armies and Spain over control of the lands of the Royal Audience of Quito, a Spanish colonial administrative jurisdiction from which would eventually emerge the modern Republic of Ecuador. The war ended with the defeat of the Spanish forces at the Battle of Pichincha on May 24, 1822. He further refers to “the infamous woman” undoubtedly meaning “Princess” Olivia Serres who spent much of her life claiming to be the product of an alleged secret marriage between Henry Duke of Cumberland (King George III’s brother) and the sister of her guardian. In 1822 she sued for the production of the will of George III in support of her claim, one daughter continued the claim into the 1860’s, which were eventually dismissed as based on forged evidence. The Duke also mentions Capt. Fox, later Major-General who married Mary FitzClarence the Duke’s second daughter by his mistress Mrs Jordan. She became the housekeeper of the State Apartments at Windsor Castle and he the equerry to Queen Adelaide and ADC to the Duke when he became King. The Marquis of Hastings to whom he also refers was Rowdon-Hastings, the Governor of Bengal. In the last 12 months or so, Venezuela, Peru, Guatemala, Panama, and San Domingo had achieved independence from Spain, and on the same day as this letter was written, Brazil from Portugal. Written from his London residence: Bushey House Octr 12 1822 Dear Sir, In answer to your two letters P. At the same time I feel you attentive to the Royal Family. As to the Chaos now going on in South America I agree with you that country must ultimately be independent of Old Spain, but it will require considerable time before any one in his senses were to undertake to put himself at the head of any one of those governments. I thank you for turning your thoughts towards Captain Fox whose head and heart are agreeably good and will be. I make no doubt, well received by the Marquis of Hastings and my daughter treated in the kindest possible manner by the Marchioness. I ever remain yours sincerely William. William, the third son of George III and younger brother and successor to George IV, was the last king and penultimate monarch of Britain’s House of Hanover. George III created him Duke of Clarence and St Andrews and Earl of Munster on 16 May 1789, He served in the Royal Navy in his youth and was, both during his reign and afterwards, nicknamed the “Sailor King”. He served in North America and the Caribbean, but saw little actual fighting. Since his two older brothers died without leaving legitimate issue, he inherited the throne when he was 64 years old. His reign saw several reforms: the poor law was updated, child labour restricted, slavery abolished in nearly all the British Empire, and the British electoral system refashioned by the Reform Act 1832. Though William did not engage in politics as much as his brother or his father, he was the last monarch to appoint a Prime Minister contrary to the will of Parliament. Through his brother, the Viceroy of Hanover, he granted that kingdom a short-lived liberal constitution. At the time of his death, William had no surviving legitimate children but he was survived by eight of the ten illegitimate children he had by the actress Dorothea Jordan, with whom he cohabited for 20 years. William was succeeded in the United Kingdom by his niece, Victoria, and in Hanover by his brother, Ernest Augustus I. Size: 22.5 x 18.5 cm approx. Photos form part of the description. The item “Duke Clarence King William IV Handwritten Signed Autograph Letter 1822 Ecuador” is in sale since Monday, March 12, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectables\Autographs\Uncertified Originals\Historical”. The seller is “bibelotslondon” and is located in london. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Type: Historical
  • Sub-Type: Royalty
  • Object: Signed Letters

Duke Clarence King William IV Handwritten Signed Autograph Letter 1822 Ecuador
in duke | 834 Words

JACOB STROUD Fort Penn 1793 ALS Hand Written Signed Letter Revolutionary War

JACOB_STROUD_Fort_Penn_1793_ALS_Hand_Written_Signed_Letter_Revolutionary_War_01_husz JACOB STROUD Fort Penn 1793 ALS Hand Written Signed Letter Revolutionary War
JACOB STROUD Fort Penn 1793 ALS Hand Written Signed Letter Revolutionary War
JACOB STROUD Fort Penn 1793 ALS Hand Written Signed Letter Revolutionary War
JACOB STROUD Fort Penn 1793 ALS Hand Written Signed Letter Revolutionary War

JACOB STROUD Fort Penn 1793 ALS Hand Written Signed Letter Revolutionary War
JACOB STROUD Fort Penn 1793 ALS Hand Written Signed Letter Revolutionary War. Excellent quality original document. Excellent condition as pictured. I have been dealing with Rev War documents for many years, and this is the first example of a Stroud signature I have ever had. Do some google searching and you will see the same, I was unable to find another example anywhere. The Monroe County Historical Association only has one Stroud signature in their collection, and it isn’t Jacob, it is a document signed by his son, Daniel. This is easily one of, and possibly THE rarest Rev War signature I have ever had. Stroud is famous for building Fort Penn on his homeland in 1776. Here is the full story. In 1775, Jacob Stroud, a military veteran of the French and Indian War, was placed in charge of the Lower Smithfield Military Company. He began this post at the rank of captain and was ultimately promoted to colonel. Stroud compiled his report, but he bypassed the local chain of command and submitted the document directly to the Committee of Safety in Philadelphia. This bold move demonstrated that Stroud took his post seriously and with an air of authority that showed both Northampton County and Philadelphia officials that he was now in command of the area north of the Blue Mountains. One year later, in 1776, Stroud was ordered by the executive council to build a stockade around his stone home. This fortified structure, which became part of Jacob Strouds command, was called Fort Penn, having been named for John Penn, governor of Pennsylvania. Unlike the frontier forts of 20 years earlier, no one in authority was sent to inspect Fort Penn. It had been policy of the British military during the French and Indian War to send an inspector to each of the Franklin forts with the task of surveying the structures condition; inventorying supplies, and reporting on the overall status of the fort and its garrison. However, to put it lightly, the political atmosphere of the area changed drastically between the 1750s and the 1770s. In the 1750s, the early colonists were British subjects who were fighting for the crown against the French and the Indians. By the late 1770s, the colonists had formed a new government and had become Americans. And the Americans were battling against the British crown, which had under its domain the strongest military force of the time. Clearly, in the summer of 1776, the condition of a small fort located in the wilds of Stroudsburg was not of the utmost importance to the administrators of the new nation. Even if it were, it is doubtful that any military personnel could have been spared to conduct an inspection. There is no official written record that details the style of Fort Penns construction, although it is believed that the fort closely resembled the earlier stockade forts that had been commissioned by Benjamin Franklin. Fort Penn did not see much activity during the American Revolution. While there were no battles there, the fort did serve three main purposes: to operate as part of a line of defense from Indian attack; to function as a depot for military supplies and munitions that were sent from Easton, and to provide a training area for new recruits for the Continental Army. Perhaps Fort Penns most important role was receiving the survivors of the Wyoming Massacre that occurred on July 3, 1778. At that time, Americans were occupied with the Revolutionary War, but there was an upturn in the violence of the native peoples toward European colonists in New York. Before 1778, relations between natives and Europeans had been relatively quiet, and the northeastern area of Pennsylvania had been largely ignored militarily. Because the area had experienced such little activity, the able-bodied men who lived in the Wyoming Valley (present-day Scranton/Wilkes-Barre area) answered Congress call to join the Continental Army. This patriotic decision left the area defenseless. Unfortunately for the Americans who remained in northeastern Pennsylvania (women, children and men who were too old to serve), British sympathizer Col. John Butler, the leader of the Tory Raiders, traveled from New York with a group of Seneca warriors into Pennsylvania and descended upon the unprepared residents of the Wyoming Valley. Victims of the initial attack of the Tory Raiders and the Seneca included many women and children, most of whom were murdered, some of whom were carried off into captivity. Those who were fortunate enough to escape fled southward through the dense forests and murky swamps toward the Delaware River. Survivors of the massacre traveled a path through present-day Coolbaugh Township in Monroe County. Many perished in the unforgiving wilderness, and the area soon became known as The Shades of Death. The remaining survivors arrived at Fort Penn, roughly 50 miles distant from the site of the massacre, where Jacob Stroud and his men received and cared for them. Following the massacre, Stroud became concerned for the safety of the residents in the immediate area, and he questioned the ability of his garrison to provide the necessary defense if attacked by the Tories or the Indians. The fort only had 60 men, and Stroud was anxious that they would be outnumbered if the Indians attacked. In addition, although Fort Penn was large, it had become crowded with the survivors of the Wyoming Massacre, and Stroud was worried that he would not be able to protect adequately his own neighbors should they seek safety behind the stockade walls. Stroud sent many letters to the Provincial Council pleading for additional munitions. On July 17, 1778, he sent a letter to Lt. John Wetzel stating, I beg you will in all haste send me more ammunition, and you may depend on my taking all the care I can. I assure you I cannot Stand nor keep my men here without more assistance. The council did respond to Stroud, sending 200 lbs. Of powder and 800 lbs. Of lead to the fort. After a year of relative calm, the spring of 1779 brought increased hostilities as local Indians planned attacks on American citizens in the vicinity of Fort Penn. Wetzel attempted to recruit militia men to send a skirmish party to engage the warring Indians, but the men refused; they only obeyed orders from Col. By this time, Stroud had become the dominant figure in the area. His had established a positive relationship with local citizens. He cared for and protected his neighbors, and, in turn, they supported him. In addition, local residents were angered by what they saw as a lack of support given to Stroud by Northampton officials and the shortage of supplies at Fort Penn. Wetzel felt his authority had been undermined. He accused Stroud of insubordination, and Stroud was required to travel to Philadelphia for a hearing in front of the Provincial Council. After hearing the arguments from Wetzel and Stroud, the members of the council resolved that they disapproved of Strouds behavior and encouraged the two parties to lay aside all animosities. The council ultimately decided that in consideration of Colonel Strouds good character as an officer, his activity and zeal in the public service, the board think proper to pass over on farther proceedings herein. A pivotal decision made by Gen. George Washington helped Stroud succeed in his goal of safeguarding the interests of the people in his area. In June 1779, Washington, in an attempt to eliminate decisively the persistent Indian threat along the American frontier, ordered Gen. John Sullivan to march across the area to engage the Indians as enemies. Sullivan began his march in Easton, with thousands of soldiers at his disposal. The army traveled through present-day Monroe County and ultimately into the state of New York. The Seneca and other Indians who had pushed southward to engage European settlers turned back in order to defend their homes. Sullivans victories against the Indians were greatly one-sided, and the campaign removed nearly all threat of an Indian retaliation. In Spring 1780, Stroud was again charged with insubordination by endeavoring to suppress the power of the lieutenant and sub-lieutenants from other commands. For this, Stroud was court-martialed, with nine charges were brought against him. The court-martial began in Philadelphia on August 1, 1781. Strouds defenders claimed that the plaintiff lieutenant had a personal grudge against Stroud. The court adjourned on August 22 with the intention of reconvening in Easton, Northampton County on September 3. However, the proceedings never took place. During that two-week hiatus, the fighting of the Revolutionary War intensified, and it was believed that Philadelphia, the capital of the young nation, would be attacked by British forces. All militia were called up to defend the city in case of attack. The court-martial against Stroud collapsed, as attention was focused on these more important matters, and Stroud was acquitted of all charges. His popularity soared, and the citizens elected him to serve as a member of the Pennsylvania Assembly. Strouds devotion to his neighbors, and theirs to him, was clear. Over time, Stroud continued with his successful business ventures, protected his investments, and further developed his town north of the Blue Mountains. Stroud died in 1806, yet the memory of him and of Fort Penn continue. Historians do not know the precise location of the fort, nor is there a detailed description of the structure itself; however, the general place in which Fort Penn stood has remained a source of pride to the citizens of the area. The last remains of Fort Penn were washed away in the Flood of 1886. A historical marker dedicated to Fort Penn stands on the 500-block of Main Street in Stroudsburg. Please look carefully at my feedback and you will see the same. To Sign up for my weekly newsletter below to see what new items I have listed! View My Other Items For Sale. Add me to your Favorite Sellers. Item will be packaged CAREFULLY and PROFESSIONALLY between stiff cardboard. Get Supersized Images & Free Image Hosting. Create your brand with Auctiva’s. The item “JACOB STROUD Fort Penn 1793 ALS Hand Written Signed Letter Revolutionary War” is in sale since Saturday, March 16, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Militaria\Revolutionary War (1775-83)\Original Period Items”. The seller is “jaypaperantiques” and is located in Hightstown, New Jersey. This item can be shipped to United States.
  • Modified Item: No
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United States

JACOB STROUD Fort Penn 1793 ALS Hand Written Signed Letter Revolutionary War