1937 GEORGE GROSZ LETTER SIGNED HANDWRITTEN & TYPED Life, Art, Spains Civil War

1937_GEORGE_GROSZ_LETTER_SIGNED_HANDWRITTEN_TYPED_Life_Art_Spains_Civil_War_01_rtxs 1937 GEORGE GROSZ LETTER SIGNED HANDWRITTEN & TYPED Life, Art, Spains Civil War
1937 GEORGE GROSZ LETTER SIGNED HANDWRITTEN & TYPED Life, Art, Spains Civil War
1937 GEORGE GROSZ LETTER SIGNED HANDWRITTEN & TYPED Life, Art, Spains Civil War

1937 GEORGE GROSZ LETTER SIGNED HANDWRITTEN & TYPED Life, Art, Spains Civil War
TYPED & HANDWRITTEN LETTER by GEORGE GROSZ. TWO PAGE LETTER, addressed to AMERICAN ARTIST MARSHALL GLASIER, dated October 10, 1937. Typed and Handwritten on both sides of a single 8.5 x 11 sheet of Douglas Manor stationery, with the letterhead: 202 SHORE ROAD – DOUGLAS MANOR – LONG ISLAND – N. Douglas Manor hosted a thriving colony of various artists, including George Grosz. The letter is typed on the front side and on half of the back side, is hand signed at the end of the typed portion, then handwritten for half a page beneath the signature. The handwritten portion is in Groszs beautiful calligraphy, written with a fountain pen. The handwritten portion is significant both in size and subject matter, 19 lines, discusses artists, reason for his quitting teaching, and touches on the Spanish Civil War by mentioning fellow artists who went to Spain to fight with the Loyalists. The front typed side of the letter has a pencil margin note that is clearly in Groszs hand, and a red pencil circling of one section. It also has a number of small, handwritten corrections, also in Groszs hand. THE COMPLETE TEXT OF THE LETTER FOLLOWS (I have broken the text up into more paragraphs than are actually present, for clarity purposes – Im sure Ive made mistakes, please forgive them – Ive added notes in parenthesis – the multiple periods are in the letter, they do not indicate skipped text). My dear Marshall Glasier. Without flattering I have to say I always thought a great deal of your work… I always felt, there was in your work something very appealing to me…. A certain quality behind it, which is very rare here USA. That “IT” (quotation marks handwritten) I speak of, is not so easy to describe… It is to me somewhat of an, I might say, “apokalyptic” (sic) feeling hidden… Likewise (“wise” crossed out with pencil) those of certain old masters towards the end of the medieval period….. A feeling of punishment, bewildering…. In a higher grade, yees (sic), maybe we call it satire…. If we see “satire” in Breughel or Roger van der Weyden…… And I doubt that myself. In your work I felt that apokalyptic ever changing and often cruel american scene…. Indeed in an (“n” written in pencil) entirely different approach and conception as in those now very famous “American scene painters”…… See, why not be open minded in regard even to the most “absurd” (quotation marks written in) trends.. Everybody (sic) of us painters can easyly (sic) detect the real things from (the word from is penciled in over the typed word “and”) the big ballyhoo of the 57 Street…. If you know what I mean. Coming back to you… I hope you will make your way…… Your first letter about conditions in your hometown struck me as a true and fine document of an (sic) real artist….. I could feel your keen and strong mind… And your serious attempt to conquer a not too (last letter penciled in) friendly world….. Your letter was very “human”….. And revealed to me a fine side of your character. Now as my english (sic) is quite limited…. I guess you get me allright (sic) and you know what I want to express. As to your pictures… I could speak to you longer – lets (sic) say, if you dont (sic) mind, (commas penciled in) as a teacher and a friend…. But here as the written word is so limited I dont (sic) do it…. Maybe I do it sometimes later as I have to go again over the fotographs (sic) you sent me along with your letter. Anyway dont (sic) forget if there is an opportunity, (comma penciled in) dont (sic) forget to send me new ones too. And planty (sic) of constant never ceasing work. In our profession the “handwork” plain and simple means so much. To put that “IT” on canvas to transform it in Form color and composition……. And if you are serious minded, there is a long way to perfection in the right sense. I was glad to hear about Mr. Pelikan (typed Pelican, the c hand-corrected to make a k). If you happen to see him please give him my best regards. Alfred George Pelikan, b 1893, Germany – d 1987, Wisconsin, USA. I can’t write a special foreword right now….. Frankly speaking, I would be very happy if I could…. But unfortunately I have no mind for it in the moment. Maybe you can make use of a few lines from this letter. Anyway I wish you a good success and with the coming success encouragement for your printing. To be a “creative” man to day (is) to be an “old fashioned” painter, a “Malerskneicht” – how the medieval artists termed it…. Well that alone is somewhat of a strain already…… Facing that world of today where so much “Chaos” seems to be at first sight…… So much incoherence and intolerance. Well if you have to do thing, if you are “possessed” you have to do it…….. It sounds quite banal but that is the truth thru all the periods………….. And the creative spirit is always nearer to the unbelievable than the blessed average humanbeing (sic). Please write again and let me know how your exhibition got under way….. I hope you may sell too……. I wish you the best and I remain very friendly. Your old teacher and friend. George Grosz (Hand Signed). (HERE BEGINS The HANDWRITTEN TEXT). I should have written much earlier, but I lived like a hermit first working and besides my own work my mind blanc (sic) — so please excuse it. I very often thought of you– I will try to interest again that fellow Maynard Walter from the Walter Galleries — You know how it is — it is for an “unknown” painter – unless you may pay, thats (sic) different of course – it is not so easy to get a place to show his work — I (sic) your case I think it will come soon! By the way Douglas Taylor went to Spain — so did Dyo Jacobs — Dyo works for Loyalist propaganda leaflets – They sent some to me — quite interesting — is’nt (sic) it. Worth noting – DEYO JACOBS (Deyo, not Dyo), Jewish American Artist, died 1938 in Spain. DOUGLAS TAYLOR, American Artist, friend of Deyo Jacobs, died 1938 in Spain. Much more about them below, after my listing description. I quit teaching entirely — took to (sic) much nerves out of me — and I had no time for myself — for my work. 8500 is hand-written in pencil on the margin of the lower half of the second page. About GEORGE GROSZ (from Wikipedia). George Grosz (July 26, 1893 July 6, 1959) was a German artist known especially for his caricatural drawings of Berlin life in the 1920s. He was a prominent member of the Berlin Dada and New Objectivity group during the Weimar Republic before he emigrated to the United States in 1933. For those of you unfamiliar with George Grosz, a quick Internet search will bring you a wealth of information. About MARSHALL GLASIER – to whom the letter is addressed (from the Museum of Wisconsin Art website). The result, commonly referred to as MAGIC REALISM, took the figurative and narrative approach of the Regionalists and the mystery, humor, and irony of the Surrealists. Glasier was born in Wauwatosa, but raised in Madison. He started at the University of Wisconsin, but didn’t last long. Then Glasier spent time at the Chicago Art Institute, but never received a degree. During this time, he was engaged to be married, but his fianc√© left him and married his best friend. His ensuing sadness led him to enlist in the Marines in 1924. He seemed to find a certain degree of success in commercial art until the Great Depression hit. His stylized drawings led one ad executive to give him some advice: go back to school and develop a more natural drawing style. He heeded that advice and STUDIED with GEORGE GROSZ in the ART STUDENT’S LEAGUE (New York City). He went about capturing the Wisconsin landscape in a fresh and cosmopolitan way. In Madison, Glasier had attracted a group of local artists and students who appreciated his brand of art. They each had a very different philosophy and approach, and Glasier regularly depicted Curry as a member of the’old guard’. Glasier would hold informal salons where they would discuss not only art, but politics, music, and literature. As his group got bigger, it also included people from Milwaukee and Chicago. Notable members of this group include Gertrude Abercrombie, John Wilde, Karl Priebe, Dudley Huppler, and Sylvia Fein. Glasier was a sort of father figure who encouraged them to develop their own style. Sylvia Fein said that he helped teach her how to draw my own personal way and how to draw while transforming and taming nature and human nature. About DEYO JACOBS and DOUGLAS TAYLOR – both mentioned in the handwritten portion of George Groszs letter. What follows is long but VERY INTERESTING (from a work about Lincoln Brigade Veterans that was originally published in The Volunteer, Volume 2, Number 3, 1979, and that I found reprinted online). Deyo Jacobs March 1938; A Delayed Obit, by Art Landis. The one book which most Lincoln vets brought home from Spain was The Book of the 15th Brigade. Though the English edition, as edited by the much loved Frank Ryan, was admirable, it still, however, had one flaw. The submissions of Deyo Jacobs, a young Jewish artist from New York, and a veteran of Jarama, were overlooked. The French made no such error. Their editor, the respected 15th Brigade Commissar, Jean Barthel, seized them instantly for his own. Thus while the English edition has no artwork at all, the pages of Le Livre de la 15eme Brigade display with pride a photo of Deyo himself, and the paintings and sketches that so reflected his own humanity and his deep understanding of the Spanish struggle. Deyo is shown (see pic), cigarette dangling and beret at a cocky angle, as a bonafide, rive gauche poilu;[1] this, while he holds the cover he designed and which was finally used for the Book of the 15th Brigade in all its editions. I remember Deyo well. Attached to the HQ Co. Mac-Pap battalion staff, he and I, with Doug Taylor, Al Cohen, John Miltenberger and Clyde Taylor, were Observers, Mappers, Billeting mostly with the snipers, we became quite close as combat cadres usually do. Our gab sessions became everything; at the Tarazona base; in the aftermath of the melee of blasted tanks and wasted lives at Fuentes; during the autumnal days of restthe fighting at Argente; Celades; and the frozen inferno of Teruel. I was forever fascinated by the stories of Deyo, Doug and Clyde Taylor (the latter from Antioch; not related); especially the wild tales of OHenrys New York, and particularly the Village They seemed to me as left-socialists of a sort, drawn to Spain like most Lincoln men, by the strength of their own convictions. Indeed, theirs were more a reflection of the straight-form-the-shoulder honesty of Debs and Jack London; of that grass-roots golden age of American socialist-populism, and of Big Bill Haywood and his 250,000 member wholly American, I. My background was California. Riding freights at fifteen. Panning gold along the Kern. As a nineteen-year-old, gung-ho YCL type with a penchant for things military, I was also, as Deyo put it, a contradiction. For I possessed a sense of the ridiculous which he swore would, in the long run, preserve my free-thinking spirit and assure me the eventual humility that all those who propose to speak for others must somehow achieve. Indeed, on the strength of this analysis, it was Deyo who campaigned for me to become the only elected headquarters Company commissar the Mac-Paps ever had. Deyo was not mechanically inclined. A rifle bolt, or the lock of a Maxim, was to him but an uninteresting jig-saw puzzle. He had little patience with such; not that he couldnt fire them. His maps, however, were fantastic; his panoramic sketches, beautiful. He was also uncoordinated, so that for him any march would quickly become a thing of pain and agony. Wed carry his gear, his pack and his rifle; do what we could Stories of Deyo are myriad. Example: The Tarazona scandal, wherein he and Doug and Clyde, much too practical to look for nonexistent paint thinner while making posters, used urine instead. The result, a beautiful but oddly colored job. The Mac-Paps laughed all the way to Aragon. At Teruel I took him, at his own request on a night patrol, to skirt the fascist wire. Id also been given the nebulous title of chief of scouts, except there werent any, only men and whoever I could whistle up. Needless to say, with Deyo by my side it was like doing the job in broad daylight; the less said, the better. A measure, too, of Deyos intensity was that in conversation youd quite often find him standing on your feet while he made his pinteyeball to eyeball! How, indeed, could one not love him? The peaceful, Christmas day of 37 were spent in Mas de las Matas, awaiting the call to Teruel. I still have the list of donated pesetas and donors for a toy and candy fund for the village children. Deyo helped collect it. On the final day, save one, we both jawboned the last bottle of cognac from the Intendencia to celebrate the birth of a son to Jack Penrod, one of the snipers. A letter from his wife had just arrived. Toward the end of the cauldron of Teruel, the Mac-Paps, depleted, worn out by the deep snows and bitter fighting, still held their post of honor before the city. In the final days of the great fascist counter-offensive, Deyo and I were sent to a post to the front and west of our 3rd Co. Shells from enemy guns over a hundred and fifty lined up hub-to-hub before Concudranged all our positions. We saw then, through the great clouds of cordite, dirt and chalk dust, such a panorama of war as is seldom given for men to witness and survive. To the east was our own 3rd Co. Beyond them three hills held by Spanish Marineros. [2] Much further along was the escarpment of El Muleton, held by the Thaaelmanns[3] And over all the plain above the valley of the Turia and the Alfambra were the advancing brigades of Francos Corps of Galicia. Through the long hours of the morning we watched as the Thaelmanns were destroyed; likewise the Marineros. Then retook one of the hillsand the British came down the face of the cliff of Santa Barbara to form a last thin line of bayonets across the valleys mouth at the 3rd Co. It was like some monstrous, living mural. All the afternoon they came on in waves and columns, banners flying, driven by their officers. They died before the heavily reinforced 3rd Co. Front and the British line. And then they ran and came on again; and were slaughtered again, and yet again Cut off as we were, we never expected to survive, Deyo and I. Still we kept up a steady fire into the flank of those hitting our 3rd Co. Time passed, and at one point I turned to see Deyo, covered as I was with dirt and chalk-dust. His map case had replaced his rifle. He was sketching what he saw, methodically, deliberately: While theres still some light, as he put it. The shelling, of course, had never ceased, nor the searching bullets from enemy machineguns. We had held and they had lost. And Deyo and I, in shock and a little high on it all, made it D6back to the railroad cut, and then to Battalion HQ. On the following day I was sent by Major Smith as liaison to the new British positions. The enemy action was repeated, and still we held. I was hit, however, in the early hours. I never saw Deyo Jacobs again, nor did I return to the battalion. Almost a year later at Ripoll, awaiting the train to take us to France, I saw Jack Penrod. He told me that in the retreats he had found Deyo and Doug Taylor beneath a tree somewhere south of Hijar; that Deyo; in bad shape, could no longer walk at all. Doug had decided to stay with him. At that very moment fascist tanks were on all the roads; enemy cavalry swarmed over all the hills and valleys. No one saw them alive again and it is presumed that like so many tens of others, they were taken finally, and summarily executed. These few paragraphs, plus the accompanying artwork falls far short of being the story of Deyo Jacobs. His background data, the milieu from which he came, is missing. Still one can conclude a point: To read of the uniqueness and humanity of Deyo is to also touch upon and recognize, perhaps, the full measure of our loss in those sixteen hundred Lincoln dead for whom there was no obits; and who, indeed, are but names today; forgotten, except by the few who knew them. The result, commonly referred to as magic realism, took the figurative and narrative approach of the Regionalists and the mystery, humor, and irony of Surrealism. He heeded that advice and STUDIED with GEORGE GROSZ in the ART STUDENT’S LEAGUE. The item “1937 GEORGE GROSZ LETTER SIGNED HANDWRITTEN & TYPED Life, Art, Spains Civil War” is in sale since Monday, July 13, 2020. This item is in the category “Books\Antiquarian & Collectible”. The seller is “bookpath” and is located in Napa, California. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Binding: Letter – Handwritten and Typed
  • Subject: Art & Photography
  • Topic: Fine Arts
  • Special Attributes: Handwritten
  • Origin: American
  • Year Printed: 1937

1937 GEORGE GROSZ LETTER SIGNED HANDWRITTEN & TYPED Life, Art, Spains Civil War

General Daniel Ruggles Signed Hand Written Letter pre Civil War Nov 23 1847

General_Daniel_Ruggles_Signed_Hand_Written_Letter_pre_Civil_War_Nov_23_1847_01_jmz General Daniel Ruggles Signed Hand Written Letter pre Civil War Nov 23 1847
General Daniel Ruggles Signed Hand Written Letter pre Civil War Nov 23 1847
General Daniel Ruggles Signed Hand Written Letter pre Civil War Nov 23 1847
General Daniel Ruggles Signed Hand Written Letter pre Civil War Nov 23 1847
General Daniel Ruggles Signed Hand Written Letter pre Civil War Nov 23 1847

General Daniel Ruggles Signed Hand Written Letter pre Civil War Nov 23 1847
Up for sale is a hand written letter described below. Confederate Brigadier General (18101897) who commanded the 1st Division, 2nd Corps Army of the Mississippi and fought at Shiloh. Autographed Letter Signed D. Ruggles, Captn Infy, one page, 7.75 x 8.5, November 23, 1847. Letter to Colonel John M. In part: I have the honor in the act of changing my seat to reiterate before this body, my protest against the assignment of Capt. Gold of the 8th Infy. To a seat above me on this commission according to his Brevet rank, as an arbitrary act of power unknown to the laws of the U. States, and the established usage of the service, and to express my regret that the Commanding General while adhering to such a decision, has felt constrained to refuse my request to be excused from sitting as a member in accordance with it. In very good condition, with intersecting folds (one vertical fold passing through first letter of the signature), and scattered discoloration and soiling. This letter has been authenticated by PSA/DNA and comes with the Letter of Authenticity. Thank you for looking. The item “General Daniel Ruggles Signed Hand Written Letter pre Civil War Nov 23 1847″ is in sale since Sunday, April 15, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Military”. The seller is “warden269″ and is located in Quakertown, Pennsylvania. This item can be shipped to United States.
  • Autograph Authentication: Professional Sports (PSA/DNA)
  • Signed by: Daniel Ruggles
  • Original/Reproduction: Original

General Daniel Ruggles Signed Hand Written Letter pre Civil War Nov 23 1847

Historic Autographs Civil War Divided General WIlliam Knapp Handwritten Letter

Historic_Autographs_Civil_War_Divided_General_WIlliam_Knapp_Handwritten_Letter_01_xnmy Historic Autographs Civil War Divided General WIlliam Knapp Handwritten Letter
Historic Autographs Civil War Divided General WIlliam Knapp Handwritten Letter
Historic Autographs Civil War Divided General WIlliam Knapp Handwritten Letter
Historic Autographs Civil War Divided General WIlliam Knapp Handwritten Letter
Historic Autographs Civil War Divided General WIlliam Knapp Handwritten Letter
Historic Autographs Civil War Divided General WIlliam Knapp Handwritten Letter

Historic Autographs Civil War Divided General WIlliam Knapp Handwritten Letter
Civil War General William Knapp Handwritten Letter to General William S. 2019 Historic Autographs Civil War – Divided Complete Transcript: STATE OF OHIO. Adjutant Generals Office, Columbus, July 15th 1872 General William S. Stryker Adjutant General of New Jersey Trenton N. Dear Sir, I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt this day of three copies of your valuable contribution to the history of the Revolutionary War, which have been distributed as requested. Please accept my thanks for the service, and allow me to congratulate you upon the success achieved in so difficult an undertaking. Very respectively, Your obedient servant, W. The item “Historic Autographs Civil War Divided General WIlliam Knapp Handwritten Letter” is in sale since Saturday, July 18, 2020. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Historical”. The seller is “treasurequest8″ and is located in West Bloomfield, Michigan. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Autograph Authentication: Historic Autograph Company
  • Signed by: William Knapp
  • Modified Item: No
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United States
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Autograph Authentication II: National Park Service
  • Industry: Historical

Historic Autographs Civil War Divided General WIlliam Knapp Handwritten Letter

2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa

2019_Civil_War_Divided_Original_Handwritten_Letter_From_BG_William_Noble_With_Coa_01_koxa 2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa
2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa
2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa
2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa
2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa
2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa

2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa
This is for the actual item pictured. It is an original handwritten letter from Brigadier General William H. Noble to his wife. The letter is dated May 18, 1868. The item was pulled from the box in a plastic sleeve with a COA. The pages are bound together with string that can be seen in the pictures. This is a very unique piece for the historical collector. Any questions, please ask. The item “2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa” is in sale since Friday, July 24, 2020. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Historical”. The seller is “jj48fan540″ and is located in Winchester, Virginia. This item can be shipped to United States.
  • Original/Reproduction: Original

2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa

RARE! Civil War MOH John Tweedale Hand Written 3 Page Letter Todd Mueller COA

RARE_Civil_War_MOH_John_Tweedale_Hand_Written_3_Page_Letter_Todd_Mueller_COA_01_oisj RARE! Civil War MOH John Tweedale Hand Written 3 Page Letter Todd Mueller COA
RARE! Civil War MOH John Tweedale Hand Written 3 Page Letter Todd Mueller COA
RARE! Civil War MOH John Tweedale Hand Written 3 Page Letter Todd Mueller COA

RARE! Civil War MOH John Tweedale Hand Written 3 Page Letter Todd Mueller COA
“Civil War MOH” John Tweedale Hand Written 3 Page Letter Dated 1890. This item is certified authentic by Todd Mueller Autographs and comes with their Certificate of Authenticity. (June 10, 1841 December 21, 1920) was a. And a recipient of America’s highest military decoration the. For his actions at the. Battle of Stones River. Degree from Columbian University now. After receiving his commission in the Army, he became Chief Clerk of the. And confirmed by Congress on April 27, 1904, as. With the rank of. He retired June 10, 1905 with the rank of. Tweedale was buried at. Arlington, Arlington County, Virginia Plot: Section 1, Lot 470. The item “RARE! Civil War MOH John Tweedale Hand Written 3 Page Letter Todd Mueller COA” is in sale since Wednesday, December 18, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Military”. The seller is “historicsellsmemorabilia” and is located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi arabia, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Brazil, Chile, Costa rica, Panama, Trinidad and tobago, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Luxembourg, Paraguay, Viet nam, Uruguay, Bangladesh, Brunei darussalam, Bolivia, Ecuador, Egypt, French guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Liechtenstein, Monaco, Macao, Martinique, Nicaragua, Peru, Pakistan, South africa, Colombia, Barbados, Bermuda, Cayman islands, Sri lanka, Maldives, Oman, Reunion.
RARE! Civil War MOH John Tweedale Hand Written 3 Page Letter Todd Mueller COA
in rare | 251 Words

1874 Civil War Confederate General James Kemper handwritten letter-Virginia Gov

1874_Civil_War_Confederate_General_James_Kemper_handwritten_letter_Virginia_Gov_01_xvj 1874 Civil War Confederate General James Kemper handwritten letter-Virginia Gov

1874 Civil War Confederate General James Kemper handwritten letter-Virginia Gov
Here’s a VERY RARE one-of-a-kind 5 3/4″ wide by 9″ long handwritten letter from famous Confederate General James Kemper who fought hard and was wounded at the battle of Gettysburg and went on to serve as governor of his home state Virginia. The letter is written entirely in General Kemper’s hand and reads: Dear Col. The purpose upon me during the closing days of the legislature, besides physical indisposition, will deprive me of the pleasure of paying my respects to Mrs. Ordway and your self this evening. With thanks + great respect, Truly yours, J. Kemper 24 April 1874. Ordway- This comes from the personal scrapbook of Brig. Albert Ordway (the letter’s recipient) and is still attached to the original scrapbook page where he placed it over a century ago. Great vintage historic item. The letter has wear and age soiling consistent with age & normal display and would display very nicely-How many of these survived? This comes from the estate of General Albert Ordway and belonged to him personally. He was instrumental in forming the Washington DC National Guard. This is an ORIGINAL item… Not a reproduction item! 1874 Civil War Confederate General James Kemper handwritten letter-Virginia Gov. 5 3/4″ wide by 9″ long handwritten letter from famous Confederate General James Kemper who fought hard and was wounded at the battle of Gettysburg and went on to serve as governor of his home state Virginia. Here’s some info on both men. James Lawson Kemper (June 11, 1823 April 7, 1895) was a lawyer, a Confederate general in the American Civil War, and the 37th Governor of Virginia. He was the youngest brigade commander and only non-professional military officer in the division that led Pickett’s Charge, during which he was severely wounded. Kemper was born at Mountain Prospect plantation in Madison County, Virginia, the son of William and Maria E. His father’s family had emigrated from near what became Siegen, Germany, in the early 18th century. His great-grandfather had been among the miners recruited for Governor Alexander Spotswood’s colony at Germanna, Virginia, and his merchant father had moved to the new town of Madison Court House in the 1790s after his own father had died falling from a horse in 1783, leaving his widow to take care of five daughters and a son. His maternal great-grandfather, Col. John Jasper Stadler, had served on George Washington’s staff as a civil engineer and planned fortifications in Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina during the American Revolutionary War, and his grandfather John Stadler Allison served as an officer in the War of 1812, but died when his daughter Maria was very young. Although several of his paternal ancestors were involved in the German Reformed Church, William Kemper was an elder in the local Presbyterian church and his mother was devout, but also hosted dances and parties that lasted several days. His brother, Frederick T. Kemper later founded Kemper Military School. James Kemper had virtually no military training as a boy, but his father and a neighboring planter, Henry Hill of Culpeper, founded Old Field School on the plantation to educate local children, including A. Hill, who became a lifelong friend. From 18301840, Kemper boarded during winters at Locust Dale Academy, which had a military corps of cadets. Kemper later attended Washington College (now Washington and Lee University) and also took civil engineering classes at nearby Virginia Military Institute. At Washington College’s graduation ceremony in 1842, 19-year-old Kemper gave the commencement address, taking for a topic The Need of a Public School System in Virginia. Summers of Kanawha County a former U. Representative, after which Washington College awarded him a Master’s degree in June 1845. He was admitted to the Virginia bar on October 2, 1846. After Congress had declared war on Mexico in 1846, President James K. Polk called for nine regiments of volunteers. Kemper and his friend Birkett D. Fry of Kanawha County traveled to the national capital on December 15, 1846, hoping to secure commissions in the First Regiment of Virginia Volunteers. After traveling to Richmond and back to Washington for more networking, Kemper learned that he had been appointed the unit’s quartermaster and captain under Col. During the MexicanAmerican War, Kemper received favorable reviews and met many future military leaders, but his unit arrived just after the Battle of Buena Vista and mainly maintained a defensive perimeter in Coahuila province. Honorably discharged from the U. He represented many fellow veterans making land claims, as well as speculated in real estate and helped form the Blue Ridge Turnpike Company between Gordonsville and the Shenandoah Valley. Interested in politics, Kemper first campaigned for office in 1850, but lost the contest to become clerk of the Commonwealth’s constitutional convention. Promoting himself as pro-slavery, anti-abolitionist, and pro-states’ rights, Kemper defeated Marcus Newman and was elected to represent Madison County in the Virginia House of Delegates in 1853 (the year his father died at age 76). A strong advocate of state military preparedness, as well as an ally of Henry A. Wise, Kemper rose to become chairman of the Military Affairs Committee. By 1858, he was serving as a brigadier general in the Virginia militia. In early 1861, Kemper became Speaker, a position he held until January 1863. Much of his term as Speaker coincided with his service in the Confederate States Army. After the start of the Civil War, Kemper served as a brigadier general in the Provisional Army of Virginia, and then a colonel in the Confederate States Army, becoming head of the 7th Virginia Infantry. At First Bull Run, Kemper led the regiment as part of Jubal Early’s brigade. His regiment was later assigned to Brigadier General A. Hill’s brigade in Major General James Longstreet’s division of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia. On May 26, Hill was promoted to division command and Kemper, as the ranking colonel, assumed command of the brigade. At Seven Pines, Kemper’s brigade attempted to relieve General D. Hill’s battered troops, but had to retreat from massed enemy artillery fire and did not engage the Union infantry. Nonetheless, Kemper was promoted to brigadier general on June 3. During the Seven Days Battles, Kemper’s brigade was held in reserve at the Battle of Gaines’s Mill. At the Battle of Glendale, the relatively inexperienced brigade spearheaded Longstreet’s attack on the Union lines; prior to this, the only general engagement the brigade had faced took place during the Battle of Williamsburg almost two months earlier, when they had been under A. Kemper’s brigade suffered the fewest losses out of Longstreet’s six brigades during the week-long confrontation. Following the Seven Days, General Robert E. Lee reorganized the army, and Kemper became a temporary division commander, commanding half of Longstreet’s former division. At the Second Battle of Bull Run, Kemper’s division took part in Longstreet’s surprise attack against the Union left flank, almost destroying Major General John Pope’s Army of Virginia. Following Second Bull Run, the more senior Brigadier General David R. Jones took over command of the division, while Kemper reverted to brigade command. At the Battle of Antietam, Kemper was positioned south of the town of Sharpsburg, defending against Major General Ambrose E. Burnside’s assault in the afternoon of September 17, 1862. He withdrew his brigade in the face of the Union advance, exposing the Confederate right flank, and the line was saved only by the hasty arrival of A. Hill’s division from Harpers Ferry. Another army reorganization after Antietam led to Kemper’s brigade being placed in a division commanded by Brigadier General George Pickett, who had been on medical leave since being wounded at Gaines Mill. The division was held in reserve at Fredericksburg, and during the spring of 1863 was on detached duty in the Richmond area. As a result, Kemper also missed the Chancellorsville Campaign. At the Battle of Gettysburg, Kemper arrived with Pickett’s division late on the second day of battle, July 2, 1863. His brigade was one of the main assault units in Pickett’s Charge, advancing on the right flank of Pickett’s line. After crossing the Emmitsburg Road, the brigade was hit by flanking fire from two Vermont regiments, driving it to the left and disrupting the cohesion of the assault. In spite of the danger, Kemper rose up in his stirrups to urge his men forwards, shouting There are the guns, boys, go for them! This act of bravado made Kemper an obvious target, and he was wounded by a bullet in the abdomen and thigh before being captured by Union troops. However, he was rescued shortly thereafter by Sgt. Leigh Blanton of the First Virginia Infantry Regiment and carried back to the Confederate lines on Seminary Ridge. General Lee encountered Kemper being carried on a stretcher and inquired about the seriousness of his wound, which Kemper said he thought was mortal. He requested that Lee do full justice to this division for its work today. During the Confederate Army’s retreat from Gettysburg, Kemper was again captured by Union forces. He was exchanged for Charles K. Graham on September 19, 1863. For the rest of the war he was too ill to serve in combat, and instead commanded the Reserve Forces of Virginia. He was promoted to major general on September 19, 1864. Kemper was paroled in May 1865. Kemper then resumed his legal career. However, the bullet that had wounded him at Gettysburg had lodged close to a major artery and could not be removed without risking his life, so he suffered groin pain for the rest of his life. Nonetheless, he tried to attract northern capital to rebuild the devastated local economy. He and former classmate and Confederate general John D. Imboden also maintained a general legal practice, which because of the times, included much bankruptcy law. Beginning in 1867, Kemper helped found Virginia’s Conservative Party, initially to oppose the new state constitution adopted by a convention chaired by John Underwood (who allied with the Radical Republican faction and opposed allowing former Confederates the vote, among other measures). In 1869 Kemper allied with another former Confederate general turned railroad entrepreneur William Mahone to elect Gilbert C. Walker to the Virginia House of Delegates. After his beloved wife Bella died in September 1870 of complications from the birth of their seventh child, Kemper’s political activities increased. Distraught from the loss, he no longer slept in the house they had shared, but in his law office. Kemper ran for Congress in the 7th Congressional District (after the redistricting caused by the 1870 census), but lost to incumbent John T. In the 1873 election for Governor of Virginia, as the Reconstruction Era ended and former Confederate soldiers regained voting rights, Kemper handily defeated former Know-Nothing and fellow ex-Confederate turned Republican Robert William Hughes of Abingdon, who won only 43.84% of the votes cast. Kemper’s supporters included former Confederate Generals Jubal Early and Fitzhugh Lee as well as Mahone and noted raider John Singleton Mosby. However, former Governor and Confederate General Henry A. Kemper served as Virginia’s Governor from January 1, 1874, to January 1, 1878. He lived frugally, using his son Meade d. 1886 as his secretary. Kemper trimmed the state budget where possible, and late in his term advocated taxing alcohol. One major political controversy involved whether to repay the state’s war debt. Kemper allied with the Funder Party to pay it off; the Readjuster Party (which Mahone came to lead) opposed him. Kemper also enforced the civil rights provisions in the new state constitution, despite having opposed it originally. His February 1874 veto of a new law passed by the General Assembly that attempted to transfer control in Petersburg from elected officials (including African Americans) to a board of commissioners appointed by a judge was sustained by Virginia’s Senate, although the law’s proponents hanged him in effigy. General Early also vehemently disagreed with Kemper’s 1875 decision to allow a militia unit of African Americans to participate in the dedication of a statue of General Stonewall Jackson. Kemper also attempted prison reform and built public schools despite budget shortages. His last major public reception, in October 1877, hosted President Rutherford B. Hayes who opened the state fair in Richmond. One modern historian analogized Kemper’s Conservative philosophy (and that of other Virginia Redeemers) to that of Gov. Wade Hampton of South Carolina. However, complications from the inoperable bullet worsened, and eventually paralyzed his left side. Kemper died on April 7, 1895 and was buried in the family cemetery. Virginia erected a historic marker at Kemper’s former home, which has now been restored by the Madison County Historical Society and other organizations, and is available for receptions and other activities. It is part of the Madison Courthouse historic district. His papers are held by the Library of Virginia. Because Kemper (like Mahone) supported education of African-Americans, some schools for African-Americans founded during his governorship were named after him, including Kemper School No. 4 in the Arlington District of Alexandria County, Virginia. Also, the Kemper Street Industrial Historic District in Lynchburg, Virginia straddles the former Lynchburg and Durham Railroad, construction of which began in May, 1887; the Norfolk and Southern Railroad acquired the line in 1898, which spurred that district’s industrial growth. Brigadier General Albert C. February 24, 1843-Died in 1897 Ordway served in the Civil War. Ordway was a student of the Lawrence Scientific School when the Civil War broke out, and left College to enlist. He emnlisted as a Private, 4th Battalion, Massachusetts Milita, April 16, 1861; First Lieutenant, 24th Massachusetts, September 2, 1861; Captain, July 5, 1864; Major, November 21, 1864; Lieutenant Colonel, April 6, 1865; Colonel, May 7, 1865. He was breveted Brigadier General, United States Volunteers, for war services. He was Aide-de-Camp to Henry Prince at New Bern, North Carolina; Provost Marhal General of Virginia following the War. He moved to Washington, D. And was Commander of the D. National Guard at the time of his death on November 21, 1897. Civil War Union Army Brevet Brigadier General. He enlisted as a Private in the 4th Battalion of the Massachusetts Militia at the onset of the Civil War, but was soon commissioned as a 1st Lieutenant in the 24th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He served as the regiment’s acting Adjutant when it took part in the Spring 1862 operations around New Berne, North Carolina. His administrative skills then brought him to Brigadier General Henry Prince, where he served on the Generals Staff as an Acting Assistant Adjutant General during the May 1863 Suffolk Campaign, and as Acting Adjutant General of the 2nd Division, III Corps in the months after the Battle of Gettysburg. When the III Corps was broken up, he accompanied his command as it was assigned to the XXIV Corps of the Army of the James, and as promoted to Captain and Ordnance Officer on the Staff of Brigadier General Alfred H. After serving nearly a year in this capacity he was promoted to Major, and assumed command of his original regiment, the 24th Massachusetts, which he led in combat up to the Confederate surrender at Appomattox in April 1865. In May of that year he was promoted to Colonel, and then was assigned to his last duty post as Provost Marshal General of the Department of Virginia. He was mustered out of Federal service in February 1866, having been brevetted Brigadier General, US Volunteers on March 13, 1865 for highly meritorious services during the war. He passed away in New York City in 1897. What a great vintage 100% authentic item! This is an ORIGINAL item, NOT REPRODUCTION item! However, if the items are heavy or require special packing / tracking, the postal rates might not be significantly reduced. We pack every item professionally using new packing materials and appropriate mailing supplies. We send all items via US Postal Service. I think you’ll find that we’re quite fair. I try and place a penny in every photo to help judge the size of the item, obviously it is there for size comparison and is not included with the item. The standard sized Lincoln head penny in the photograph is there for size comparison ONLY and is not included in the package. We’re just trying to help you figure out how big the item is. We try and always be as accurate as we can in the item. Description and will gladly answer any question about item size & description when needed. Postal service and is never refundable. Many of the items are VINTAGE and although they are in very fine condition, they may not function as well as when they were made decades ago. In other words, if you intend on using a 50+ year old letter opener and it breaks, don’t get mad at us. It may be hard to believe, but we have received a couple negatives because people broke vintage items while trying to use them. We comb the antique stores & malls as well as Antique shows & flea markets from Coast-to-coast in an effort to try and find that special addition to your collection. We travel hundreds of miles and wake up with the sun in search of these items. We truly have a love for our hobby / business. We generally charge the same postal rate that the US Post Office charges us. We’ll respect you, but please respect us as well. Get images that make Supersized seem small. Tailor your auctions with Auctiva’s. Track Page Views With. Auctiva’s FREE Counter. The item “1874 Civil War Confederate General James Kemper handwritten letter-Virginia Gov” is in sale since Tuesday, April 14, 2020. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Military”. The seller is “ghost-train65″ and is located in Noblesville, Indiana. This item can be shipped to United States.
1874 Civil War Confederate General James Kemper handwritten letter-Virginia Gov

1997 Roger Wilkins Autographed Signed Hand Written Letter Civil Rights Leader

1997_Roger_Wilkins_Autographed_Signed_Hand_Written_Letter_Civil_Rights_Leader_01_wa 1997 Roger Wilkins Autographed Signed Hand Written Letter Civil Rights Leader
1997 Roger Wilkins Autographed Signed Hand Written Letter Civil Rights Leader
1997 Roger Wilkins Autographed Signed Hand Written Letter Civil Rights Leader

1997 Roger Wilkins Autographed Signed Hand Written Letter Civil Rights Leader
1997 Roger Wilkins Autographed Signed Hand Written Letter Civil Rights Leader. Leader, professor of history, and. Wilkins worked as a welfare lawyer in. S administration at age 33, one of the highest-ranking blacks ever to serve in the executive branch up to that time. Roger Wilkins was sworn in as Director of Community Relations Service on Friday 4 February 1966 in a ceremony at The White House as per page 2 of President Johnson’s Diary for that day. Leaving government in 1969 at the end of the Johnson administration, he worked briefly for the. Before joining the editorial staff of the. In 1972 for exposing the Watergate scandal that eventually forced President. S resignation from office. In 1974 to work for the. Followed five years later by a brief stay at the now-defunct. In 1980 he became a radio news commentator, work he still does today for. Wilkins was the Robinson Professor of History and American Culture at. Until his retirement in 2007. During his tenure at George Mason, Wilkins was, arguably, one of the most preeminent professors in residence at that time. Wilkins is also the publisher of the. And is the nephew of. A past executive director of the NAACP. The item “1997 Roger Wilkins Autographed Signed Hand Written Letter Civil Rights Leader” is in sale since Friday, June 17, 2016. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Historical”. The seller is “zartanthegreat1″ and is located in Woodstock, Georgia. This item can be shipped worldwide.
1997 Roger Wilkins Autographed Signed Hand Written Letter Civil Rights Leader

Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS – ALS Handwritten Letter + COA

Civil_War_Confederate_President_JEFFERSON_DAVIS_ALS_Handwritten_Letter_COA_01_msiw Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS - ALS Handwritten Letter + COA
Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS - ALS Handwritten Letter + COA
Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS - ALS Handwritten Letter + COA
Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS - ALS Handwritten Letter + COA
Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS - ALS Handwritten Letter + COA
Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS - ALS Handwritten Letter + COA
Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS - ALS Handwritten Letter + COA
Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS - ALS Handwritten Letter + COA
Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS - ALS Handwritten Letter + COA

Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS - ALS Handwritten Letter + COA
2019 Historic Autographs Civil War – Divided —–> Jefferson Davis ALS Handwritten Letter to a Close Hotelier Friend in Montgomery, Alabama. Jefferson Davis, Autograph Endorsement Initialed, on envelope addressed to Mary T. 6″ x 3.375″. Tear on front through one word, but no loss of text; twentieth-century annotations in blue ink. Certificate of Authenticity and Letter of Authenticity included. It was not my neglect but the failure of your Post master to deliver. [Postmark on Recto:] ADVERTISED SEP 4 1886 BIRMINGHAM, ALA. [Stamped on Verso:] UNCLAIMED FORWARDED TO D. OCT 2 1886 from Birmingham, Ala. Comes with a Certificate from. > Deemed authentic by an expert with the National Park Service. The item “Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS – ALS Handwritten Letter + COA” is in sale since Saturday, June 20, 2020. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Historical”. The seller is “treasurequest8″ and is located in West Bloomfield, Michigan. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, South africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi arabia, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Chile, Colombia, Costa rica, Dominican republic, Panama, Trinidad and tobago, Guatemala, El salvador, Honduras, Jamaica, Antigua and barbuda, Aruba, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Saint kitts and nevis, Saint lucia, Turks and caicos islands, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Brunei darussalam, Bolivia, Egypt, French guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Cayman islands, Liechtenstein, Sri lanka, Luxembourg, Monaco, Macao, Martinique, Maldives, Nicaragua, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Uruguay, Russian federation.
  • Autograph Authentication II: National Park Service
  • Autograph Authentication III: John Reznikoff
  • Modified Item: No
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United States
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Signed by: Jefferson Davis
  • Autograph Authentication: Historic Autograph Company

Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS - ALS Handwritten Letter + COA

Ulysses Grant handwritten letter 1868 re losing a $25 check Civil War general

Ulysses_Grant_handwritten_letter_1868_re_losing_a_25_check_Civil_War_general_01_zar Ulysses Grant handwritten letter 1868 re losing a $25 check Civil War general
Ulysses Grant handwritten letter 1868 re losing a $25 check Civil War general
Ulysses Grant handwritten letter 1868 re losing a $25 check Civil War general

Ulysses Grant handwritten letter 1868 re losing a $25 check Civil War general
ULYSSES GRANT, COMMANDING GENERAL OF THE UNITED STATES ARMY, LOSES A TWENTY-FIVE-DOLLAR CHECK. After leading the Union Army to victory in the American Civil War, Grant became the Eighteenth President of the United States. An autograph letter signed U. Grant as Commanding General of the U. Grant asks for a lost check to be reissued. Dear Sir: Some weeks or so since I received your check for twenty-five dollars and seven cents, bring amount overpaid by me when settling my last bill, which I have either mislaid or lost. It is barely possible that I may have endorsed the check, which was made payable to my order, so that it can be collected by anyone into whose hands it may fall. Grant would become President the following year. The letter is in very good condition with some ink bleeding through onto the first page. As this short missive shows, even the most extraordinary historical figures occasionally made simple mistakes. All items are issued with an invoice that states in writing at the bottom All autographs and historical papers are guaranteed authentic for life by me. New Jersey residents, please add 7% for the Governor’s salary ;. Buyers who do not live in the United States must pay. The item “Ulysses Grant handwritten letter 1868 re losing a $25 check Civil War general” is in sale since Thursday, June 18, 2020. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Historical”. The seller is “stuartlutz” and is located in Short Hills, New Jersey. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, South africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi arabia, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Chile, Colombia, Panama, Jamaica, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Brunei darussalam, Bolivia, Egypt, French guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Cayman islands, Liechtenstein, Sri lanka, Luxembourg, Monaco, Macao, Martinique, Maldives, Nicaragua, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Uruguay.
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Signed by: Ulysses Grant

Ulysses Grant handwritten letter 1868 re losing a $25 check Civil War general

HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA

HA_Civil_War_CSA_Confederate_President_Jefferson_Davis_Handwritten_Letter_COA_01_hzp HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA
HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA
HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA
HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA
HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA
HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA
HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA
HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA
HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA

HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA
2019 Historic Autographs Civil War – Divided —–> Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter to a Friend in Montgomery, Alabama. Jefferson Davis, Autograph Endorsement Initialed, on envelope addressed to Mary T. 6″ x 3.375″. Tear on front through one word, but no loss of text; twentieth-century annotations in blue ink. Certificate of Authenticity and Letter of Authenticity included. It was not my neglect but the failure of your Post master to deliver. [Postmark on Recto:] ADVERTISED SEP 4 1886 BIRMINGHAM, ALA. [Stamped on Verso:] UNCLAIMED FORWARDED TO D. OCT 2 1886 from Birmingham, Ala. Comes with a Certificate from. > Deemed authentic by an expert with the National Park Service. Also included is a Letter of Authenticity from the Historic Autograph Company guaranteeing authenticity with a lifetime MBG. The item “HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA” is in sale since Saturday, April 18, 2020. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Historical”. The seller is “treasurequest8″ and is located in West Bloomfield, Michigan. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi arabia, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Chile, Costa rica, Panama, Trinidad and tobago, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Bangladesh, Brunei darussalam, Bolivia, Egypt, French guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Monaco, Macao, Martinique, Nicaragua, Pakistan, Paraguay, Uruguay.
  • Autograph Authentication II: National Park Service
  • Autograph Authentication III: John Reznikoff
  • Modified Item: No
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United States
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Signed by: Jefferson Davis
  • Autograph Authentication: Historic Autograph Company

HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA