Important Handwritten Letter Map Major General Charles George Gordon Uganda 1875

Important Handwritten Letter Map Major General Charles George Gordon Uganda 1875
Important Handwritten Letter Map Major General Charles George Gordon Uganda 1875
Important Handwritten Letter Map Major General Charles George Gordon Uganda 1875
Important Handwritten Letter Map Major General Charles George Gordon Uganda 1875
Important Handwritten Letter Map Major General Charles George Gordon Uganda 1875

Important Handwritten Letter Map Major General Charles George Gordon Uganda 1875
Bibelotslondon deal in ephemera and curiosities from Britain and around the world. Our diverse inventory is carefully chosen and constantly evolving. We work very hard to offer the highest quality works at competitive prices and we may be able to source specific pieces for our clients upon request. Our inventory is listed online, and we strive to keep our website completely up to date, so our customers can easily check availability. We believe in offering clients items that are unique and rare for aficionados of the antique’s and collector’s world. Written in ink between 19th October 1875 and 24th October 1875 from the station he built at Dufli in Uganda. Gordon had succeeded in establishing a line of way stations from the Sobat confluence on the White Nile to the frontier of Uganda, where he proposed to open a route from Mombasa. An exciting letter in which he describes in detail his trip along the great river, its current and where best to reassemble steamers that could be carried past the fast rapids for the exploration of Lake Albert. Despite Gordon personally exploring Lake Albert and the Victorian Nile, he states here that he did not wish for it and was tired and lonely. Hoping that HM Stanley would instead complete Lake Albert, that even Chippendell was lucky to have escaped this place. He goes further into detail regarding his dealings with Muteesa I Mukaabya Walugembe Kayiira who was Kabaka of the Kingdom of Buganda from 1856 until 1884. He was the thirtieth Kabaka of Buganda. He did not welcome Egyptian expansionism into the Great Lakes region. Besides acting as an administrator and explorer, Gordon had to act as a diplomat, dealing carefully with the local rulers and tribes. His attempts to establish an Egyptian garrison in the Buganda had been stymied by the cunning Mueteesa, who forced the Egyptians to build their fort at his capital of Lubaga, making the 140 or so Egyptian soldiers into his virtual hostages. Gordon chose not to meet Mueteesa himself, instead sending his chief medical officer, a German convert to Islam Dr. Finally, he concludes by expressing his consternation at the Khedive who will he expects legitimise items confiscated by Samuel Baker as being legal. Despite the letter not being signed it is possible that there was never a signature as he ends the letter with a statement. Rough spellings of certain names have been kept as Gordon wrote the letter. Pushing on through the thick, humid jungle and steep ravines of Uganda amid heavy rains and vast hordes of insects in the summer of 1875 with an average daily temperature of 95 °F (35 °C), down to Lake Kyoga was not a pleasantry. He remained in the Equatoria province until October 1876 and quickly learned that before he could establish stations to crush the slave trade that he would have to first explore the area to find out where the best places for building stations. Col Nugent xxx Horse Guards London Dufli 19 Oct 1875 My dear Nugent I do not know when I last wrote to you so I shall take up my story from Lubaga, the last station which completes my chain of posts along the river some 32 miles from this place which is above all obstacles up to the lake. After having more or less installed the troops at Lubaga and subdued the remaining hostile Turks on this side (left bank) I rode on xxx, and around 9. The river bank is followed for about 20 miles and then turned inland around xxx ravines passing through a tangled jungle of grass & with no inhabitants and at last debunking into the plain which leads up to [the] lake, on the 17. I went down towards the gorge above and along [the] River bank, & nearing the river then some 5 miles from here heard the thunder of a more than ordinary rapids, approaching the edge which was a steep rocky slope over grown with grass, I saw the river teaming along with a slope of 1 in 6 and with a force which was appalling quite putting it out of the question for anything to live in it, so there is an end of bringing up the steamer from below into the lake. This continues for two or three miles where the river is open again. So now what have I gained? I have established very xxx of posts along river, & I have found that I can use the river for transport for 98 miles out of 100 miles which is something. I saw on a rocky islet a hut, & may be when the River falls, I may be able through under channels to get small boats or Niggers up. The xxx nature of the banks would prevent the hauling of them along the bank of river. This is the end of it. I left my interpreter an Arab xxx at Lubaga not very well when I came up here, and yesterday I heard he was dead, so I have no interpreter now, and I must go as I best can. I have now sent in the xxx of the small 50 for steamer to have her put together here, and have ordered troops to move on Anfina, from Titila, and is uncle of Kubu Riza who has dispossessed him of his territory & who wants me to send him a garrison. Look at the sketch MAP I hope then to go to Axx and thence to fall on Megungo and thence to descend to Dufli. I would xxx go up river to Megungo but do not dare to do so without interpreter with their troops. For one will be sure to come to loggerheads with Mteri who wrongfully govern a world wide popularity could be strongly upheld in Europe. I hope Stanley will complete Albert Lake for I have no desire to see it and only want to get out of this work as soon as possible. This is a deadly plan I expect the air is hot, dreary & humid and there is a mournful stillness that would be depressing to most men, the high xxx will be dry enough to xxx xxx, & then it will be better. The Moogie are still xxx and waiting till the group is burnable or turnable. The doctor was ill for a very few days and I think fear had much to do with his death. What catastrophes have there not been in so short a time. Chippendell even if he gets home has had an escape in not coming up here. As you may imagine it is very lonely for me here, but I subsist & get along pretty well. There are only two or three Arabs up here, they cannot stand the climate, nor could any one, unless fully employed all his time, the delays are the dangerous times & they are unavoidable. Dufile (also Dufilé, Duffli, Duffle, or Dufli) was originally a fort built by Emin Pasha, the Governor of Equatoria, in 1879; it is located on the Albert Nile just inside Uganda, close to a site chosen in 1874 by Gordon to assemble steamers that were carried there overland which are also described in this letter. Lubaga is a hill in Kampala, Uganda’s capital and largest city. Lake Albert, also Albert Nyanza and formerly Lake Mobutu Sese Seko, is a lake located in Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is one of the African Great Lakes. Lake Albert is Africa’s seventh-largest lake, and the world’s twenty-seventh largest lake by volume. Also known for his search for the source of the Nile, his work in and development of the Congo Basin region in association with King Leopold II of Belgium, and commanding the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition. Gordon, also known as Chinese Gordon, Gordon Pasha, and Gordon of Khartoum, was a British Army officer and administrator. He saw action in the Crimean War as an officer in the British Army. But he made his military reputation in China, where he was placed in command of the “Ever Victorious Army, ” a force of Chinese soldiers led by European officers. In the early 1860s, Gordon and his men were instrumental in putting down the Taiping Rebellion, regularly defeating much larger forces. For these accomplishments, he was given the nickname “Chinese Gordon” and honours from both the Emperor of China and the British. In 1872, Gordon was sent to inspect the British military cemeteries in the Crimea, and when passing through Constantinople he made the acquaintance of the Prime Minister of Egypt Raghib Pasha, who opened negotiations for Gordon to serve under the Khedive, Isma’il Pasha, who was popularly called “Isma’il the Magnificent” on the account of his lavish spending. In 1873, Gordon received a definite offer from the Khedive, which he accepted with the consent of the British government, and proceeded to Egypt early in 1874. He entered the service of the Khedive of Egypt in 1873 (with British government approval) and became the Governor-General of the Sudan, where he did much to suppress revolts and the slave trade. After a short stay in Cairo, Gordon proceeded to Khartoum via Suakin and Berber. In Khartoum Gordon attended a dinner with the Governor-General, Ismail Aiyub Pasha entertained with barely dressed belly dancers whom one of Gordon’s officers drunkenly attempted to have sex with, leading to a disgusted Gordon walking out, saying he was shocked that Aiyub allowed these things to happen in his palace. From Khartoum, he proceeded up the White Nile to Gondokoro. During his time in Sudan, Gordon was much involved in attempting to suppress the slave trade while struggling against a corrupt and inefficient Egyptian bureaucracy that had no interest in suppressing the slave trade. A serious revolt then broke out in the Sudan, led by a Muslim religious leader and self-proclaimed Mahdi, Muhammad Ahmad. In early 1884 Gordon had been sent to Khartoum with instructions to secure the evacuation of loyal soldiers and civilians and to depart with them. However, after evacuating about 2,500 British civilians, in defiance of those instructions, he retained a smaller group of soldiers and non-military men. In the buildup to battle, the two leaders corresponded, each attempting to convert the other to his faith, but neither would accede. Besieged by the Mahdi’s forces, Gordon organized a citywide defence lasting almost a year that gained him the admiration of the British public, but not of the government, which had wished him not to become entrenched. Only when public pressure to act had become irresistible did the government, with reluctance, send a relief force. It arrived two days after the city had fallen and Gordon had been killed. Size: 21.5 x 13.5 cm approx. Photos form part of the description. International items may take longer. Bibelotslondon cannot be held responsible for items lost abroad. The item “Important Handwritten Letter Map Major General Charles George Gordon Uganda 1875″ is in sale since Monday, March 12, 2018. This item is in the category “Collectables\Autographs\Uncertified Originals\Other Uncertified Originals”. The seller is “bibelotslondon” and is located in London. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Sub-Type: Exploration
  • Type: Historical
  • Object: Handwritten Letters

Important Handwritten Letter Map Major General Charles George Gordon Uganda 1875