2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa

2019_Civil_War_Divided_Original_Handwritten_Letter_From_BG_William_Noble_With_Coa_01_koxa 2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa
2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa
2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa
2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa
2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa
2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa

2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa
This is for the actual item pictured. It is an original handwritten letter from Brigadier General William H. Noble to his wife. The letter is dated May 18, 1868. The item was pulled from the box in a plastic sleeve with a COA. The pages are bound together with string that can be seen in the pictures. This is a very unique piece for the historical collector. Any questions, please ask. The item “2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa” is in sale since Friday, July 24, 2020. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Historical”. The seller is “jj48fan540″ and is located in Winchester, Virginia. This item can be shipped to United States.
  • Original/Reproduction: Original

2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa

1874 Civil War Confederate General James Kemper handwritten letter-Virginia Gov

1874_Civil_War_Confederate_General_James_Kemper_handwritten_letter_Virginia_Gov_01_xvj 1874 Civil War Confederate General James Kemper handwritten letter-Virginia Gov

1874 Civil War Confederate General James Kemper handwritten letter-Virginia Gov
Here’s a VERY RARE one-of-a-kind 5 3/4″ wide by 9″ long handwritten letter from famous Confederate General James Kemper who fought hard and was wounded at the battle of Gettysburg and went on to serve as governor of his home state Virginia. The letter is written entirely in General Kemper’s hand and reads: Dear Col. The purpose upon me during the closing days of the legislature, besides physical indisposition, will deprive me of the pleasure of paying my respects to Mrs. Ordway and your self this evening. With thanks + great respect, Truly yours, J. Kemper 24 April 1874. Ordway- This comes from the personal scrapbook of Brig. Albert Ordway (the letter’s recipient) and is still attached to the original scrapbook page where he placed it over a century ago. Great vintage historic item. The letter has wear and age soiling consistent with age & normal display and would display very nicely-How many of these survived? This comes from the estate of General Albert Ordway and belonged to him personally. He was instrumental in forming the Washington DC National Guard. This is an ORIGINAL item… Not a reproduction item! 1874 Civil War Confederate General James Kemper handwritten letter-Virginia Gov. 5 3/4″ wide by 9″ long handwritten letter from famous Confederate General James Kemper who fought hard and was wounded at the battle of Gettysburg and went on to serve as governor of his home state Virginia. Here’s some info on both men. James Lawson Kemper (June 11, 1823 April 7, 1895) was a lawyer, a Confederate general in the American Civil War, and the 37th Governor of Virginia. He was the youngest brigade commander and only non-professional military officer in the division that led Pickett’s Charge, during which he was severely wounded. Kemper was born at Mountain Prospect plantation in Madison County, Virginia, the son of William and Maria E. His father’s family had emigrated from near what became Siegen, Germany, in the early 18th century. His great-grandfather had been among the miners recruited for Governor Alexander Spotswood’s colony at Germanna, Virginia, and his merchant father had moved to the new town of Madison Court House in the 1790s after his own father had died falling from a horse in 1783, leaving his widow to take care of five daughters and a son. His maternal great-grandfather, Col. John Jasper Stadler, had served on George Washington’s staff as a civil engineer and planned fortifications in Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina during the American Revolutionary War, and his grandfather John Stadler Allison served as an officer in the War of 1812, but died when his daughter Maria was very young. Although several of his paternal ancestors were involved in the German Reformed Church, William Kemper was an elder in the local Presbyterian church and his mother was devout, but also hosted dances and parties that lasted several days. His brother, Frederick T. Kemper later founded Kemper Military School. James Kemper had virtually no military training as a boy, but his father and a neighboring planter, Henry Hill of Culpeper, founded Old Field School on the plantation to educate local children, including A. Hill, who became a lifelong friend. From 18301840, Kemper boarded during winters at Locust Dale Academy, which had a military corps of cadets. Kemper later attended Washington College (now Washington and Lee University) and also took civil engineering classes at nearby Virginia Military Institute. At Washington College’s graduation ceremony in 1842, 19-year-old Kemper gave the commencement address, taking for a topic The Need of a Public School System in Virginia. Summers of Kanawha County a former U. Representative, after which Washington College awarded him a Master’s degree in June 1845. He was admitted to the Virginia bar on October 2, 1846. After Congress had declared war on Mexico in 1846, President James K. Polk called for nine regiments of volunteers. Kemper and his friend Birkett D. Fry of Kanawha County traveled to the national capital on December 15, 1846, hoping to secure commissions in the First Regiment of Virginia Volunteers. After traveling to Richmond and back to Washington for more networking, Kemper learned that he had been appointed the unit’s quartermaster and captain under Col. During the MexicanAmerican War, Kemper received favorable reviews and met many future military leaders, but his unit arrived just after the Battle of Buena Vista and mainly maintained a defensive perimeter in Coahuila province. Honorably discharged from the U. He represented many fellow veterans making land claims, as well as speculated in real estate and helped form the Blue Ridge Turnpike Company between Gordonsville and the Shenandoah Valley. Interested in politics, Kemper first campaigned for office in 1850, but lost the contest to become clerk of the Commonwealth’s constitutional convention. Promoting himself as pro-slavery, anti-abolitionist, and pro-states’ rights, Kemper defeated Marcus Newman and was elected to represent Madison County in the Virginia House of Delegates in 1853 (the year his father died at age 76). A strong advocate of state military preparedness, as well as an ally of Henry A. Wise, Kemper rose to become chairman of the Military Affairs Committee. By 1858, he was serving as a brigadier general in the Virginia militia. In early 1861, Kemper became Speaker, a position he held until January 1863. Much of his term as Speaker coincided with his service in the Confederate States Army. After the start of the Civil War, Kemper served as a brigadier general in the Provisional Army of Virginia, and then a colonel in the Confederate States Army, becoming head of the 7th Virginia Infantry. At First Bull Run, Kemper led the regiment as part of Jubal Early’s brigade. His regiment was later assigned to Brigadier General A. Hill’s brigade in Major General James Longstreet’s division of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia. On May 26, Hill was promoted to division command and Kemper, as the ranking colonel, assumed command of the brigade. At Seven Pines, Kemper’s brigade attempted to relieve General D. Hill’s battered troops, but had to retreat from massed enemy artillery fire and did not engage the Union infantry. Nonetheless, Kemper was promoted to brigadier general on June 3. During the Seven Days Battles, Kemper’s brigade was held in reserve at the Battle of Gaines’s Mill. At the Battle of Glendale, the relatively inexperienced brigade spearheaded Longstreet’s attack on the Union lines; prior to this, the only general engagement the brigade had faced took place during the Battle of Williamsburg almost two months earlier, when they had been under A. Kemper’s brigade suffered the fewest losses out of Longstreet’s six brigades during the week-long confrontation. Following the Seven Days, General Robert E. Lee reorganized the army, and Kemper became a temporary division commander, commanding half of Longstreet’s former division. At the Second Battle of Bull Run, Kemper’s division took part in Longstreet’s surprise attack against the Union left flank, almost destroying Major General John Pope’s Army of Virginia. Following Second Bull Run, the more senior Brigadier General David R. Jones took over command of the division, while Kemper reverted to brigade command. At the Battle of Antietam, Kemper was positioned south of the town of Sharpsburg, defending against Major General Ambrose E. Burnside’s assault in the afternoon of September 17, 1862. He withdrew his brigade in the face of the Union advance, exposing the Confederate right flank, and the line was saved only by the hasty arrival of A. Hill’s division from Harpers Ferry. Another army reorganization after Antietam led to Kemper’s brigade being placed in a division commanded by Brigadier General George Pickett, who had been on medical leave since being wounded at Gaines Mill. The division was held in reserve at Fredericksburg, and during the spring of 1863 was on detached duty in the Richmond area. As a result, Kemper also missed the Chancellorsville Campaign. At the Battle of Gettysburg, Kemper arrived with Pickett’s division late on the second day of battle, July 2, 1863. His brigade was one of the main assault units in Pickett’s Charge, advancing on the right flank of Pickett’s line. After crossing the Emmitsburg Road, the brigade was hit by flanking fire from two Vermont regiments, driving it to the left and disrupting the cohesion of the assault. In spite of the danger, Kemper rose up in his stirrups to urge his men forwards, shouting There are the guns, boys, go for them! This act of bravado made Kemper an obvious target, and he was wounded by a bullet in the abdomen and thigh before being captured by Union troops. However, he was rescued shortly thereafter by Sgt. Leigh Blanton of the First Virginia Infantry Regiment and carried back to the Confederate lines on Seminary Ridge. General Lee encountered Kemper being carried on a stretcher and inquired about the seriousness of his wound, which Kemper said he thought was mortal. He requested that Lee do full justice to this division for its work today. During the Confederate Army’s retreat from Gettysburg, Kemper was again captured by Union forces. He was exchanged for Charles K. Graham on September 19, 1863. For the rest of the war he was too ill to serve in combat, and instead commanded the Reserve Forces of Virginia. He was promoted to major general on September 19, 1864. Kemper was paroled in May 1865. Kemper then resumed his legal career. However, the bullet that had wounded him at Gettysburg had lodged close to a major artery and could not be removed without risking his life, so he suffered groin pain for the rest of his life. Nonetheless, he tried to attract northern capital to rebuild the devastated local economy. He and former classmate and Confederate general John D. Imboden also maintained a general legal practice, which because of the times, included much bankruptcy law. Beginning in 1867, Kemper helped found Virginia’s Conservative Party, initially to oppose the new state constitution adopted by a convention chaired by John Underwood (who allied with the Radical Republican faction and opposed allowing former Confederates the vote, among other measures). In 1869 Kemper allied with another former Confederate general turned railroad entrepreneur William Mahone to elect Gilbert C. Walker to the Virginia House of Delegates. After his beloved wife Bella died in September 1870 of complications from the birth of their seventh child, Kemper’s political activities increased. Distraught from the loss, he no longer slept in the house they had shared, but in his law office. Kemper ran for Congress in the 7th Congressional District (after the redistricting caused by the 1870 census), but lost to incumbent John T. In the 1873 election for Governor of Virginia, as the Reconstruction Era ended and former Confederate soldiers regained voting rights, Kemper handily defeated former Know-Nothing and fellow ex-Confederate turned Republican Robert William Hughes of Abingdon, who won only 43.84% of the votes cast. Kemper’s supporters included former Confederate Generals Jubal Early and Fitzhugh Lee as well as Mahone and noted raider John Singleton Mosby. However, former Governor and Confederate General Henry A. Kemper served as Virginia’s Governor from January 1, 1874, to January 1, 1878. He lived frugally, using his son Meade d. 1886 as his secretary. Kemper trimmed the state budget where possible, and late in his term advocated taxing alcohol. One major political controversy involved whether to repay the state’s war debt. Kemper allied with the Funder Party to pay it off; the Readjuster Party (which Mahone came to lead) opposed him. Kemper also enforced the civil rights provisions in the new state constitution, despite having opposed it originally. His February 1874 veto of a new law passed by the General Assembly that attempted to transfer control in Petersburg from elected officials (including African Americans) to a board of commissioners appointed by a judge was sustained by Virginia’s Senate, although the law’s proponents hanged him in effigy. General Early also vehemently disagreed with Kemper’s 1875 decision to allow a militia unit of African Americans to participate in the dedication of a statue of General Stonewall Jackson. Kemper also attempted prison reform and built public schools despite budget shortages. His last major public reception, in October 1877, hosted President Rutherford B. Hayes who opened the state fair in Richmond. One modern historian analogized Kemper’s Conservative philosophy (and that of other Virginia Redeemers) to that of Gov. Wade Hampton of South Carolina. However, complications from the inoperable bullet worsened, and eventually paralyzed his left side. Kemper died on April 7, 1895 and was buried in the family cemetery. Virginia erected a historic marker at Kemper’s former home, which has now been restored by the Madison County Historical Society and other organizations, and is available for receptions and other activities. It is part of the Madison Courthouse historic district. His papers are held by the Library of Virginia. Because Kemper (like Mahone) supported education of African-Americans, some schools for African-Americans founded during his governorship were named after him, including Kemper School No. 4 in the Arlington District of Alexandria County, Virginia. Also, the Kemper Street Industrial Historic District in Lynchburg, Virginia straddles the former Lynchburg and Durham Railroad, construction of which began in May, 1887; the Norfolk and Southern Railroad acquired the line in 1898, which spurred that district’s industrial growth. Brigadier General Albert C. February 24, 1843-Died in 1897 Ordway served in the Civil War. Ordway was a student of the Lawrence Scientific School when the Civil War broke out, and left College to enlist. He emnlisted as a Private, 4th Battalion, Massachusetts Milita, April 16, 1861; First Lieutenant, 24th Massachusetts, September 2, 1861; Captain, July 5, 1864; Major, November 21, 1864; Lieutenant Colonel, April 6, 1865; Colonel, May 7, 1865. He was breveted Brigadier General, United States Volunteers, for war services. He was Aide-de-Camp to Henry Prince at New Bern, North Carolina; Provost Marhal General of Virginia following the War. He moved to Washington, D. And was Commander of the D. National Guard at the time of his death on November 21, 1897. Civil War Union Army Brevet Brigadier General. He enlisted as a Private in the 4th Battalion of the Massachusetts Militia at the onset of the Civil War, but was soon commissioned as a 1st Lieutenant in the 24th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He served as the regiment’s acting Adjutant when it took part in the Spring 1862 operations around New Berne, North Carolina. His administrative skills then brought him to Brigadier General Henry Prince, where he served on the Generals Staff as an Acting Assistant Adjutant General during the May 1863 Suffolk Campaign, and as Acting Adjutant General of the 2nd Division, III Corps in the months after the Battle of Gettysburg. When the III Corps was broken up, he accompanied his command as it was assigned to the XXIV Corps of the Army of the James, and as promoted to Captain and Ordnance Officer on the Staff of Brigadier General Alfred H. After serving nearly a year in this capacity he was promoted to Major, and assumed command of his original regiment, the 24th Massachusetts, which he led in combat up to the Confederate surrender at Appomattox in April 1865. In May of that year he was promoted to Colonel, and then was assigned to his last duty post as Provost Marshal General of the Department of Virginia. He was mustered out of Federal service in February 1866, having been brevetted Brigadier General, US Volunteers on March 13, 1865 for highly meritorious services during the war. He passed away in New York City in 1897. What a great vintage 100% authentic item! This is an ORIGINAL item, NOT REPRODUCTION item! However, if the items are heavy or require special packing / tracking, the postal rates might not be significantly reduced. We pack every item professionally using new packing materials and appropriate mailing supplies. We send all items via US Postal Service. I think you’ll find that we’re quite fair. I try and place a penny in every photo to help judge the size of the item, obviously it is there for size comparison and is not included with the item. The standard sized Lincoln head penny in the photograph is there for size comparison ONLY and is not included in the package. We’re just trying to help you figure out how big the item is. We try and always be as accurate as we can in the item. Description and will gladly answer any question about item size & description when needed. Postal service and is never refundable. Many of the items are VINTAGE and although they are in very fine condition, they may not function as well as when they were made decades ago. In other words, if you intend on using a 50+ year old letter opener and it breaks, don’t get mad at us. It may be hard to believe, but we have received a couple negatives because people broke vintage items while trying to use them. We comb the antique stores & malls as well as Antique shows & flea markets from Coast-to-coast in an effort to try and find that special addition to your collection. We travel hundreds of miles and wake up with the sun in search of these items. We truly have a love for our hobby / business. We generally charge the same postal rate that the US Post Office charges us. We’ll respect you, but please respect us as well. Get images that make Supersized seem small. Tailor your auctions with Auctiva’s. Track Page Views With. Auctiva’s FREE Counter. The item “1874 Civil War Confederate General James Kemper handwritten letter-Virginia Gov” is in sale since Tuesday, April 14, 2020. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Military”. The seller is “ghost-train65″ and is located in Noblesville, Indiana. This item can be shipped to United States.
1874 Civil War Confederate General James Kemper handwritten letter-Virginia Gov

Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS – ALS Handwritten Letter + COA

Civil_War_Confederate_President_JEFFERSON_DAVIS_ALS_Handwritten_Letter_COA_01_msiw Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS - ALS Handwritten Letter + COA
Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS - ALS Handwritten Letter + COA
Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS - ALS Handwritten Letter + COA
Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS - ALS Handwritten Letter + COA
Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS - ALS Handwritten Letter + COA
Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS - ALS Handwritten Letter + COA
Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS - ALS Handwritten Letter + COA
Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS - ALS Handwritten Letter + COA
Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS - ALS Handwritten Letter + COA

Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS - ALS Handwritten Letter + COA
2019 Historic Autographs Civil War – Divided —–> Jefferson Davis ALS Handwritten Letter to a Close Hotelier Friend in Montgomery, Alabama. Jefferson Davis, Autograph Endorsement Initialed, on envelope addressed to Mary T. 6″ x 3.375″. Tear on front through one word, but no loss of text; twentieth-century annotations in blue ink. Certificate of Authenticity and Letter of Authenticity included. It was not my neglect but the failure of your Post master to deliver. [Postmark on Recto:] ADVERTISED SEP 4 1886 BIRMINGHAM, ALA. [Stamped on Verso:] UNCLAIMED FORWARDED TO D. OCT 2 1886 from Birmingham, Ala. Comes with a Certificate from. > Deemed authentic by an expert with the National Park Service. The item “Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS – ALS Handwritten Letter + COA” is in sale since Saturday, June 20, 2020. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Historical”. The seller is “treasurequest8″ and is located in West Bloomfield, Michigan. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, South africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi arabia, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Chile, Colombia, Costa rica, Dominican republic, Panama, Trinidad and tobago, Guatemala, El salvador, Honduras, Jamaica, Antigua and barbuda, Aruba, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Saint kitts and nevis, Saint lucia, Turks and caicos islands, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Brunei darussalam, Bolivia, Egypt, French guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Cayman islands, Liechtenstein, Sri lanka, Luxembourg, Monaco, Macao, Martinique, Maldives, Nicaragua, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Uruguay, Russian federation.
  • Autograph Authentication II: National Park Service
  • Autograph Authentication III: John Reznikoff
  • Modified Item: No
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United States
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Signed by: Jefferson Davis
  • Autograph Authentication: Historic Autograph Company

Civil War Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS - ALS Handwritten Letter + COA

HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA

HA_Civil_War_CSA_Confederate_President_Jefferson_Davis_Handwritten_Letter_COA_01_hzp HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA
HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA
HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA
HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA
HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA
HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA
HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA
HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA
HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA

HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA
2019 Historic Autographs Civil War – Divided —–> Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter to a Friend in Montgomery, Alabama. Jefferson Davis, Autograph Endorsement Initialed, on envelope addressed to Mary T. 6″ x 3.375″. Tear on front through one word, but no loss of text; twentieth-century annotations in blue ink. Certificate of Authenticity and Letter of Authenticity included. It was not my neglect but the failure of your Post master to deliver. [Postmark on Recto:] ADVERTISED SEP 4 1886 BIRMINGHAM, ALA. [Stamped on Verso:] UNCLAIMED FORWARDED TO D. OCT 2 1886 from Birmingham, Ala. Comes with a Certificate from. > Deemed authentic by an expert with the National Park Service. Also included is a Letter of Authenticity from the Historic Autograph Company guaranteeing authenticity with a lifetime MBG. The item “HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA” is in sale since Saturday, April 18, 2020. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Historical”. The seller is “treasurequest8″ and is located in West Bloomfield, Michigan. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi arabia, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Chile, Costa rica, Panama, Trinidad and tobago, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Bangladesh, Brunei darussalam, Bolivia, Egypt, French guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Monaco, Macao, Martinique, Nicaragua, Pakistan, Paraguay, Uruguay.
  • Autograph Authentication II: National Park Service
  • Autograph Authentication III: John Reznikoff
  • Modified Item: No
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United States
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Signed by: Jefferson Davis
  • Autograph Authentication: Historic Autograph Company

HA Civil War CSA Confederate President Jefferson Davis Handwritten Letter + COA

1873 Civil War Confederate Maj. George Washington Custis Lee handwritten letter

1873_Civil_War_Confederate_Maj_George_Washington_Custis_Lee_handwritten_letter_01_gsag 1873 Civil War Confederate Maj. George Washington Custis Lee handwritten letter

1873 Civil War Confederate Maj. George Washington Custis Lee handwritten letter
Here’s a VERY RARE one-of-a-kind 8″ wide by 10″ long handwritten letter from the son of Confederate General Robert E. Lee who was a Major in the Confederate Army himself, George Washington Custis Lee on the letterhead of “Washington and Lee University” in Lexington Virginia. Letter is written entirely in his hand and is dated March 5, 1873. Albert Ordway, Richmond Va. As their organ it is my agreeable duty to tender you our best thanks for your very acceptable donation, with the assurance that your wishes in regard to it shall be faithfully carried out, and that the kind sentiments accompanying it are gratefully appreciated and reciprocated. Very respectfully, Yr Obdt Svt, G. Lee This comes from the personal scrapbook of Brig. Albert Ordway himself and is still attached to the original scrapbook page where he placed it over a century ago. This comes from the personal scrapbook of Brig. Albert Ordway (the letter’s recipient) and is still attached to the original scrapbook page where he placed it over a century ago. Great vintage historic item. The letter has wear and age soiling consistent with age & normal display and would display very nicely-How many of these survived? This comes from the estate of General Albert Ordway and belonged to him personally. He was instrumental in forming the Washington DC National Guard. This is an ORIGINAL item… Not a reproduction item! 1873 Civil War Confederate Maj. George Washington Custis Lee handwritten letter! Kind 8″ wide by 10″ long handwritten letter from the son of Confederate General Robert E. Here’s some info on both men. George Washington Custis Lee (September 16, 1832 February 18, 1913), also known as Custis Lee, was the eldest son of Robert E. Lee and Mary Anna Custis Lee. His grandfather George Washington Custis was the step-grandson and adopted son of George Washington and grandson of Martha Custis Washington. He served as a Confederate general in the American Civil War, primarily as an aide-de-camp to President Jefferson Davis, and succeeded his father as president of Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia. George Washington Custis Lee was born in Fort Monroe, Virginia. He was educated at numerous boarding schools to prepare him in his father’s footsteps. He was educated at the classical school of Reverend George A. Smith in his younger years. He then entered the mathematical school of Benjamin Hallowell. Lee was not given admission to West Point at 16. Lee’s father, Robert E. Lee, then sent a letter to General Winfield Scott on his son’s behalf. Zachary Taylor then nominated Lee to West Point. Lee was then accepted to West Point at 17. From 1850 to 1854, Lee attended West Point. During his first year, Lee excelled both academically and militarily. Toward the end of his first year he was almost expelled, when alcohol was found in his room. He claimed that he did not put it there, and got away with only minor punishments. He did well in his second year also. At the beginning of his third year, his father became the Superintendent of the U. Lee graduated first in his class of forty-six, in 1854. Other members of his class included J. Stuart, William Dorsey Pender, John Pegram, James Deshler, Horace Randal, and John Villepigue. Custis Lee was then commissioned in the Corps of Engineers, as his father before him. He was given the rank of brevet second lieutenant. He served primarily in California, Georgia, and Florida during his time in the United States Army. In 1855, he was given the rank of second lieutenant in the Regular Army. In 1859, Lee was commissioned a first lieutenant. Lee was then stationed in Washington D. During the period of secession and Fort Sumter. He then resigned from the Army, in the spring of 1861 after Virginia seceded from the Union. He resigned about two weeks after his father had done the same. Lee then offered his services to his father’s Virginia state forces. Custis Lee served in the Virginia state forces, until July 1861. At that time he was given a commission as a captain in the Confederate States Army. During the next few months, Lee worked in the Confederate Engineers. He spent his time constructing fortifications for the new capital city, Richmond. At the end of August 1861, Lee was offered and accepted the position of aide-de-camp to Confederate President Jefferson Davis. He was then promoted to the rank of colonel. Lee served in his position for the next three years of the war. He was often sent on missions to assess the military, and would then return to report to Davis. Lee became the commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, Custis Lee had constant contact with his father. In 1862, during the Peninsula Campaign, Custis Lee was put in charge of supervising the engineers at Drewry’s Bluff. In June 1863, he was promoted to brigadier general. Lee was discouraged from taking a field command by Davis, but encouraged by his father. Lee asked his father for a field command, but his father replied that his highest duty was obedience to his superiors. For the most part, he obeyed Davis, but during the Battle of Gettysburg, Custis Lee was given the command of the troops in Richmond. In 1864, Custis Lee was placed in command of Richmond’s local defenses against General Grant and General Benjamin Butler. He did so well that he was given command of Richmond’s eastern defenses at Chaffin’s Bluff. Lee remained at Chaffin’s Bluff throughout the next months, and in 1864, he was promoted to major general. Shortly before the end of the war, he commanded troops in the field and was captured at Sayler’s Creek on April 6; three days before his father surrendered on Palm Sunday April 9, 1865 to Lieutenant-General Ulysses S. Grant at the McLean House in the village of Appomattox Court House, Virginia. In late 1865, Lee was hired as a professor at the Virginia Military Institute. Lee held this position until the death of his father. Between 1871 and 1897, Lee served as the ninth president of Washington and Lee University. In 1877, seven years after his father’s death, Custis Lee sued in a case with assistance from Robert Lincoln that went all the way to the United States Supreme Court to regain title to the family mansion, Arlington House and plantation, which had become Arlington Cemetery. Lee’s case, United States v. 196, was decided in his favor by a 54 vote, in 1882. Lee won both the house and the 1,100 acres surrounding the mansion. In 1897, Lee resigned as president of Washington and Lee University. He then moved to the home of his late brother, Major General William Henry Fitzhugh Lee’s Ravensworth Mansion. Custis Lee died on February 18, 1913, in Alexandria, Virginia, and is buried in the Lee Chapel, near his family members. He never married, and had no children. Brigadier General Albert C. February 24, 1843-Died in 1897 Ordway served in the Civil War. Ordway was a student of the Lawrence Scientific School when the Civil War broke out, and left College to enlist. He emnlisted as a Private, 4th Battalion, Massachusetts Milita, April 16, 1861; First Lieutenant, 24th Massachusetts, September 2, 1861; Captain, July 5, 1864; Major, November 21, 1864; Lieutenant Colonel, April 6, 1865; Colonel, May 7, 1865. He was breveted Brigadier General, United States Volunteers, for war services. He was Aide-de-Camp to Henry Prince at New Bern, North Carolina; Provost Marhal General of Virginia following the War. He moved to Washington, D. And was Commander of the D. National Guard at the time of his death on November 21, 1897. Civil War Union Army Brevet Brigadier General. He enlisted as a Private in the 4th Battalion of the Massachusetts Militia at the onset of the Civil War, but was soon commissioned as a 1st Lieutenant in the 24th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He served as the regiment’s acting Adjutant when it took part in the Spring 1862 operations around New Berne, North Carolina. His administrative skills then brought him to Brigadier General Henry Prince, where he served on the Generals Staff as an Acting Assistant Adjutant General during the May 1863 Suffolk Campaign, and as Acting Adjutant General of the 2nd Division, III Corps in the months after the Battle of Gettysburg. When the III Corps was broken up, he accompanied his command as it was assigned to the XXIV Corps of the Army of the James, and as promoted to Captain and Ordnance Officer on the Staff of Brigadier General Alfred H. After serving nearly a year in this capacity he was promoted to Major, and assumed command of his original regiment, the 24th Massachusetts, which he led in combat up to the Confederate surrender at Appomattox in April 1865. In May of that year he was promoted to Colonel, and then was assigned to his last duty post as Provost Marshal General of the Department of Virginia. He was mustered out of Federal service in February 1866, having been brevetted Brigadier General, US Volunteers on March 13, 1865 for highly meritorious services during the war. He passed away in New York City in 1897. What a great vintage 100% authentic item! This is an ORIGINAL item, NOT REPRODUCTION item! However, if the items are heavy or require special packing / tracking, the postal rates might not be significantly reduced. We pack every item professionally using new packing materials and appropriate mailing supplies. We send all items via US Postal Service. I think you’ll find that we’re quite fair. I try and place a penny in every photo to help judge the size of the item, obviously it is there for size comparison and is not included with the item. The standard sized Lincoln head penny in the photograph is there for size comparison ONLY and is not included in the package. We’re just trying to help you figure out how big the item is. We try and always be as accurate as we can in the item. Description and will gladly answer any question about item size & description when needed. Postal service and is never refundable. Many of the items are VINTAGE and although they are in very fine condition, they may not function as well as when they were made decades ago. In other words, if you intend on using a 50+ year old letter opener and it breaks, don’t get mad at us. It may be hard to believe, but we have received a couple negatives because people broke vintage items while trying to use them. We comb the antique stores & malls as well as Antique shows & flea markets from Coast-to-coast in an effort to try and find that special addition to your collection. We travel hundreds of miles and wake up with the sun in search of these items. We truly have a love for our hobby / business. We generally charge the same postal rate that the US Post Office charges us. We’ll respect you, but please respect us as well. Auctiva offers Free Image Hosting and Editing. Auctiva gets you noticed! Track Page Views With. Auctiva’s FREE Counter. The item “1873 Civil War Confederate Maj. George Washington Custis Lee handwritten letter” is in sale since Tuesday, April 14, 2020. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Military”. The seller is “ghost-train65″ and is located in Noblesville, Indiana. This item can be shipped to United States.
1873 Civil War Confederate Maj. George Washington Custis Lee handwritten letter

2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa

2019_Civil_War_Divided_Original_Handwritten_Letter_From_BG_William_Noble_With_Coa_01_sspd 2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa
2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa
2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa
2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa
2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa
2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa

2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa
This is for the actual item pictured. It is an original handwritten letter from Brigadier General William H. Noble to his wife. The letter is dated May 18, 1868. The item was pulled from the box in a plastic sleeve with a COA. The pages are bound together with string that can be seen in the pictures. This is a very unique piece for the historical collector. Any questions, please ask. The item “2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa” is in sale since Friday, January 31, 2020. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Historical”. The seller is “jj48fan540″ and is located in Winchester, Virginia. This item can be shipped to United States.
  • Original/Reproduction: Original

2019 Civil War Divided Original Handwritten Letter From BG William Noble With Coa

1871 Civil War Union General John A. Dix Handwritten Signed Autographed Letter

1871_Civil_War_Union_General_John_A_Dix_Handwritten_Signed_Autographed_Letter_01_pnj 1871 Civil War Union General John A. Dix Handwritten Signed Autographed Letter
1871 Civil War Union General John A. Dix Handwritten Signed Autographed Letter
1871 Civil War Union General John A. Dix Handwritten Signed Autographed Letter

1871 Civil War Union General John A. Dix Handwritten Signed Autographed Letter
Civil War Union General John A. Dix Handwritten Signed Autographed Letter. Dated January 9, 1871. Discussing a meeting with a professor. Measures 8 1/4 x 5 1/4 inches. From a smoke-free environment. The item “1871 Civil War Union General John A. Dix Handwritten Signed Autographed Letter” is in sale since Wednesday, April 3, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Historical”. The seller is “camerapro12″ and is located in El Paso, Texas. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, South africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi arabia, Ukraine, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa rica, Dominican republic, Panama, Trinidad and tobago, Guatemala, El salvador, Honduras, Jamaica, Antigua and barbuda, Aruba, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Saint kitts and nevis, Saint lucia, Montserrat, Turks and caicos islands, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Brunei darussalam, Bolivia, Ecuador, Egypt, French guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Cayman islands, Liechtenstein, Sri lanka, Luxembourg, Monaco, Macao, Martinique, Maldives, Nicaragua, Oman, Peru, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Viet nam, Uruguay, Russian federation.
  • Signed by: John A. Dix
  • Original/Reproduction: Original

1871 Civil War Union General John A. Dix Handwritten Signed Autographed Letter

1884 Civil War Confederate Soldier Hugh Buchanan Hand Written Letter US Congress

1884_Civil_War_Confederate_Soldier_Hugh_Buchanan_Hand_Written_Letter_US_Congress_01_tl 1884 Civil War Confederate Soldier Hugh Buchanan Hand Written Letter US Congress
1884 Civil War Confederate Soldier Hugh Buchanan Hand Written Letter US Congress
1884 Civil War Confederate Soldier Hugh Buchanan Hand Written Letter US Congress
1884 Civil War Confederate Soldier Hugh Buchanan Hand Written Letter US Congress

1884 Civil War Confederate Soldier Hugh Buchanan Hand Written Letter US Congress
1884 Civil War Confederate Soldier Hugh Buchanan Hand Written Letter. After the War Hugh Buchanan became a US Representative of Georgia. Letter is hand written and signed on official US House of Representative Washington DC Stationary, measures 5 1/2″ x 9″. (September 15, 1823 June 11, 1890) was a. Buchanan immigrated to the United States and settled in Vermont. He attended the public schools of that State. Admitted to the bar. In 1845 and commenced practice in. He served as member of the State senate in 1855 and 1857. He served as delegate to the Democratic National Conventions in 1856 and 1868. He served as presidential elector on the Democratic ticket of Breckinridge and Lane in 1860. He enlisted in the. In June 1861 and served until 1865. Buchanan was elected to the. Congress, but his credentials were not presented to the House as the State had not been readmitted to representation. He was appointed judge of the superior court of the Coweta circuit in August 1872 and served until September 1880. He served as delegate to the State constitutional convention of 1877. Buchanan was elected as a. Congresses (March 4, 1881-March 3, 1885). He was not a candidate for renomination in 1884. He was interred in Oak Hill Cemetery. The item “1884 Civil War Confederate Soldier Hugh Buchanan Hand Written Letter US Congress” is in sale since Thursday, May 21, 2015. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Historical”. The seller is “zartanthegreat1″ and is located in Woodstock, Georgia. This item can be shipped worldwide.
1884 Civil War Confederate Soldier Hugh Buchanan Hand Written Letter US Congress

Civil War General Benjamin F. Butler handwritten letter, signed autograph, CDV

Civil_War_General_Benjamin_F_Butler_handwritten_letter_signed_autograph_CDV_01_bzo Civil War General Benjamin F. Butler handwritten letter, signed autograph, CDV
Civil War General Benjamin F. Butler handwritten letter, signed autograph, CDV
Civil War General Benjamin F. Butler handwritten letter, signed autograph, CDV
Civil War General Benjamin F. Butler handwritten letter, signed autograph, CDV
Civil War General Benjamin F. Butler handwritten letter, signed autograph, CDV
Civil War General Benjamin F. Butler handwritten letter, signed autograph, CDV
Civil War General Benjamin F. Butler handwritten letter, signed autograph, CDV
Civil War General Benjamin F. Butler handwritten letter, signed autograph, CDV
Civil War General Benjamin F. Butler handwritten letter, signed autograph, CDV
Civil War General Benjamin F. Butler handwritten letter, signed autograph, CDV
Civil War General Benjamin F. Butler handwritten letter, signed autograph, CDV
Civil War General Benjamin F. Butler handwritten letter, signed autograph, CDV

Civil War General Benjamin F. Butler handwritten letter, signed autograph, CDV
Beautiful presentation dated November 17, 1882. All professionally framed, matted and ready to hang. Includes hand written letter, signature, and Civil War CDV photograph of General Butler. See all photos as there is No Return. The item “Civil War General Benjamin F. Butler handwritten letter, signed autograph, CDV” is in sale since Tuesday, July 2, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Militaria\Civil War (1861-65)\Original Period Items\Documents”. The seller is “paulmanny1920″ and is located in Hayward, California. This item can be shipped to United States.
  • Original/Reprint: Original Print
  • Date of Creation: 1880-1889
  • Size Type/Largest Dimension: Large (Greater than 10″)
  • Region of Origin: US
  • Photo Type: CDV
  • Framing: Matted & Framed
  • Color: Black & White

Civil War General Benjamin F. Butler handwritten letter, signed autograph, CDV

Civil War Gen. Joshua Chamberlain autographed hand written letter. Authenticated

Civil_War_Gen_Joshua_Chamberlain_autographed_hand_written_letter_Authenticated_01_zsk Civil War Gen. Joshua Chamberlain autographed hand written letter. Authenticated
Civil War Gen. Joshua Chamberlain autographed hand written letter. Authenticated
Civil War Gen. Joshua Chamberlain autographed hand written letter. Authenticated
Civil War Gen. Joshua Chamberlain autographed hand written letter. Authenticated
Civil War Gen. Joshua Chamberlain autographed hand written letter. Authenticated
Civil War Gen. Joshua Chamberlain autographed hand written letter. Authenticated
Civil War Gen. Joshua Chamberlain autographed hand written letter. Authenticated
Civil War Gen. Joshua Chamberlain autographed hand written letter. Authenticated

Civil War Gen. Joshua Chamberlain autographed hand written letter. Authenticated
Joshua Chamberlain autographed hand written letter on State of Maine, executive department stationary, while Mr. Chamberlain served as Governor of Maine. July 2, 2019 marks the 156th anniversary of Joshua Chamberlain’s heroic defense of Little Round Top at Gettysburg, for which he was awarded the Medal of Honor. This lettet has been authenticated. Any questions, feel free to contact me. Measures 13 1/2″ X 19″ This piece was framed with all archival material and museum glass. A one of a kind piece. Thank you for looking. The item “Civil War Gen. Joshua Chamberlain autographed hand written letter. Authenticated” is in sale since Sunday, June 30, 2019. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Militaria\Civil War (1861-65)\Other Civil War-Related Items”. The seller is “mattr6779″ and is located in Macomb, Michigan. This item can be shipped to United States.
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United States

Civil War Gen. Joshua Chamberlain autographed hand written letter. Authenticated